Postgraduate study
Criminology & Sociology

PgDip/MSc Global Development and Social Research

This programme caters for the growing need for development specialists with independent research skills.

Course information

Full-time

  • 1 year

More full-time details

Part-time

  • 2 years

More part-time details

  • Monday or Tuesday, 5.00pm - 8.00pm
  • Enrolment date: September
  • Admission enquiries: 01642 384491

Contact details

  • Facilities

    School of Social Sciences, Business & Law facilities

    The School of Social Sciences, Business & Law has fantastic state-of-the-art facilities that reflect the broad range of courses it offers. From a hydrotherapy pool and environmental chamber to a replica courtroom and crime scene house, students have access to the kind of equipment they will go on to use throughout their careers.

 

With the maturing of transnational patterns of growth and the recent financial collapse, there is a great need for trained scholars with a critical perspective on development, capable of articulating policy interventions based on independent research, and with skills to advise agencies responsible for development interventions. The course develops the skills you need as a development practitioner interested in conducting independent research.

Please note, the PgDip is one academic year in duration, while the MSc is one calendar year in duration.

Modules

Core modules

Conceptualising and Designing Social Research

This module introduces you to the relationship between philosophy, theory and social research. This includes an examination of the different and competing positions of interpretivism and positivism and an exploration of the major debates in epistemology. Similarly, the relationship between theory and social research are analysed using a selection of theoretical positions such as, post-structuralism and critical realism. Techniques of data analysis and considerations of ethics in the design of a social research project are also examined.

You explore how these debates inform and underpin choices made when designing social research, and draw upon this knowledge to design a research bid. You are assessed by way of a research bid which details the aims and outcomes of the research, methodology, and dissemination strategy, and includes supporting statements on philosophy and theory. (7,500 words)

Social Research Methods

This module focuses on the study of both quantitative and qualitative research methods. It introduces the philosophical paradigms which are central to both approaches and how these interact to produce the methods utilised. The module allows you to not only view these methods from a theoretical / academic perspective but also to engage in practicalities of these methodologies using data provided in seminars and assessment.

Social Research Project

You conduct independent research, which is written up as a research report of potentially publishable quality – either a journal article or a report to a client. It should demonstrate, along with appendicised material, that you have met the learning objectives of this course.

You have the scope to demonstrate your skills and knowledge in a sustained piece of independent work that can enhance your CV.

Sociology of International Development

This module introduces you to some of the key philosophies, theoretical paradigms, social issues and research methodologies within the Sociology of International Development.

You begin by exploring theoretical perspectives on development including the neoliberal development agenda and alternative and critical development paradigms, including feminist and postcolonial approaches and post-development. You are then encouraged to critically engage with issues in contemporary world development from a sociological perspective, in particular with reference to policies within different parts of the world.

The module covers diverse approaches to development in practice, supported with empirical examples, and key issues related to poverty, social exclusion, globalisation, the environment and technological change. You develop your understanding of the complexities of gender, ‘race’, ethnicity and culture in relation to development, and engage with methodological and ethical issues related to development research and knowledge production.

There are two forms of assessment, including an oral group presentation (20 mins presentation and 1,500-word write up which makes up 30% of the module mark) and written essay (5,000 words, which makes up 70% of the module mark).

Transnational Sociology

This module focuses on the developing academic study of transnationalism and transnational communities across the globe.

It begins by examining the distinction between ‘broad’ (structural economic and political processes, capitalist globalisation) and ‘narrow’ (individual and family/kin social relations across international borders) transnationalism (defined generally as social relations across international borders).

The module offers a particular focus upon narrow transnationalism but will relate this to the context of broad transnationalism, illustrating how the two are inter-related and reflecting how narrow transnationalism impacts upon some of the issues examined in the module Sociology of International Development.

The module is roughly divided into two parts. The first analyses transnationalism as it manifests itself through migration, communities, social exclusion, gender, and social and political movements. The second part of the module provides a more in-depth investigation of South Asia-UK migration.

The module is assessed a 2,500 word-essay and a 2,500-word case study.

 

Modules offered may vary.

How you learn

Modules are delivered in lectures, seminars and PC lab workshops. Each module has three hours of formal contact per week for 12-15 weeks. You are expected to undertake independent study to complement lectures and seminars. Academic staff are available on campus to support your learning.

How you are assessed

All modules are assessed by in-course assignments.

Career opportunities

Non-governmental organisations, development agencies (government and semi-government), international development bodies and forums are all potential employers of graduates with skills sets such as those gained on this course.

Entry requirements

Applicants should normally have a good second-class honours degree in a relevant field. However, those who have relevant professional qualifications and/or relevant experience will also be considered.

For additional information please see the entry requirements in our admissions section

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country

Course information

Full-time

  • 1 year

More full-time details

Part-time

  • 2 years

More part-time details

  • Monday or Tuesday, 5.00pm - 8.00pm
  • Enrolment date: September
  • Admission enquiries: 01642 384491

Contact details

Open days

Postgraduate prospectusRequest a prospectus

If you would like more information about our courses or the University, please register with us.