School of Health & Social Care
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Alan Batterham

Alan Batterham

About Alan Batterham


Alan is an interdisciplinary research scientist with broad interests and expertise in physical activity, exercise and health outcomes, measurement and evaluation issues, and research design and biostatistics. He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the Royal Statistical Society. Alan is also an Associate Editor of Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise and Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, a member of the Statistical Advisory Board of BMJ Open, and the Statistics Consultant for the three journals of the Physiological Society.


Research interests and activities

Professor Batterham’s work spans the Institute’s rehabilitation and public health themes. His research interests include the influence of physical activity and exercise interventions on a variety of health outcomes in both adults and children.



Alan has a substantial body of work on the influence of body size on human physiology and performance (allometry), involving long-term collaborations with colleagues at Liverpool John Moores and Loughborough Universities. 

He also collaborates with colleagues in the Department of Academic Anaesthesia at James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough, conducting trials of exercise prehabilitation and rehabilitation in a variety of patient groups, and spinal cord stimulation interventions in patients with chronic pain. 

Current research interests include the potential benefits of high-intensity interval exercise training for both general (public health) and clinical populations. An additional focus is the use of multidimensional physical activity profiles from 24-7 objective monitoring to inform the development and evaluation of interventions and the evolution of physical activity recommendations.

Underpinning all of the investigations is a critical research focus on methods for making magnitude-based inferences in research studies, emphasising the clinical significance of effects. This work is conducted in collaboration with Professor William G. Hopkins from Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.

In the news

  • Current Students
    Leeds Beckett University (Web) 26/05/2017
    Professor Alan Batterham conducted a study in a Waist-to-height ratio, more accurate than BMI in identifying obesity.


  • BMJ Open - Editorial Board
    BMJ Open, 23.08.2015
    Greg Atkinson and Alan Battenham, mentioned as board members.


  • Why I take the stairs at the BBC
    BBC (Web), 14/11/2013
    Alan Batterham, professor of exercise science at Teesside University, said: 'StepJockey helps individuals to build a vigorous physical activity into their daily routine and is an excellent, time-effic


  • Why I take the stairs at the BBC
    RocketNews (Web), 17/11/2013,
    Alan Batterham, professor of exercise science at Teesside University, said: 'StepJockey helps individuals to build a vigorous physical activity into their daily routine and is an excellent, time-effic


  • Innovative health company brings the gym into the office place
    Health and Beauty (Blog), 21/09/2013
    According to Professor Alan Batterham, Professor in Exercise at Teesside University and an advisor to StepJockey, stair climbing is a surprisingly powerful form of exercise and it has benefits that go


  • Ten life-changing ideas under research at UK universities
    The Telegraph (Web)
    A boxing computer game has been tested out on 50 unhealthy men from Teeside as part of Teeside University's research into whether this type of game can improve people's health. Co-researcher Dr Alan B


  • University of Bath/Teesside University Colouring activity
    The Times Higher Education Supplement, 28/02/2013, p.14
    A traffic-light system similar to that used to display health information on food could be used to help people become more active. In a study by the universities of Bath and Teesside, participants wor


  • Campus round-up
    Times Higher Education Supplement (Web), 28/02/2013
    University of Bath/Teesside University : A traffic-light system similar to that used to display health information on food could be used to help people become more active. In a study by the universiti


  • A novel way to get lighter?
    Western Daily Press (Late City), 23/02/2013, p.5
    Scientists have called for a traffic light system to be introduced for exercise to help combat obesity. Researchers from the University of Bath and Teesside University say the scale could be used to i


  • Lights aid could help exercise
    Northern Echo, 21/02/2013, p.46; University of Bath (Web), 20/02/2013; Health Canal (Web), 20/02/2013; Medical Xpress (Web), 21/02/2013; News-Medical.Net (Web), 25/02/2013
    Researchers at Teesside and Bath universities found that rating activities using red, amber and green gives a better picture about whether a person is doing the right kind of physical activity for hea