School of Health & Social Care
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Sharon Hamilton

Sharon Hamilton

About Sharon Hamilton

Sharon is a Professor in Nursing, Director of the Teesside Centre for Evidence-Based Practice: An Affiliate Centre of the Joanna Briggs Institute, and Director of the Centre for Health and Social Evaluation (CHASE). Sharon trained as a registered nurse at University College Hospital in London and after working in hospitals in London, Essex and Sheffield she undertook a degree in sociology and research methods, and a masters degree in social policy. She then moved into a public health specialist role in a public health department and later completed a PhD focusing on the implementation of evidence based practice in acute stroke care. Immediately prior to joining the staff at Teesside University, Sharon held a joint appointment as head of nursing research at two London hospitals and a University. She aims to combine her clinical knowledge with her research expertise to make a positive contribution to health policy and clinical practice.

Sharon was successful with an application to open a collaborating centre of the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) at Teesside University. The Joanna Briggs Institute is the international not-for-profit research and development facility within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Adelaide, South Australia. The JBI supports a global network of collaborating centres that work to synthesis research evidence in health. The Teesside centre will play an active role in the collaboration and is working closely with clinicians to ensure that important and relevant topics are selected for review.

In 2014 Sharon was awarded a Winston Churchill Memorial Trust (WCMT) Fellowship to visit Australia to explore the Australian approach to reducing undetected deterioration in acutely ill patients. As a WCMT Fellow, Sharon is an ambassador for the Trust and is keen to support others to apply for a fellowship.

Research interests and activities

An overarching theme running through many of Sharon’s research studies is a focus on the evaluation of public health interventions.  Recently this has included the evaluation of a complex intervention to support pregnant women to stop smoking and an evaluation of an innovative back pain pathway being implemented across GP practices in the North East of England. 

Another major theme of Sharon’s work is the synthesis of research evidence to inform clinical practice and policy.  As part of this work, Sharon and a group of Teesside colleagues are developing a programme of systematic reviews.  These reviews will bring together research evidence that underpins important areas in health policy and practice, and will make a major contribution to knowledge. Furthermore, work will also be undertaken to translate the findings from these reviews into best practice information sheets that will provide clinicians with easy access to the key findings and recommendations.

Current and recently completed projects

Intermittent fasting interventions for the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults aged 18 years and over: a systematic review. 

The effectiveness of early intervention, community based programmes that aim to improve cognitive, social and emotional development, speech, language and nutrition of children from conception to 2 years old: a comprehensive systematic review. 

An evaluation of the introduction of Neighbourhood Care Teams (NCT).  Funder: Scarborough and Ryedale CCG.  

Improving outcomes for both simple low back pain and acute radiculopathy (sciatica) for the North East of England population. Funding: Health Foundation. (Evaluation lead) 

Patient reported experiences of using community neurological services whilst living with a long term neurological condition: a qualitative systematic review.  

Natural experimental evaluation of a complex intervention to promote increased smoking cessation rates among pregnant women in maternity care. Funding: NIHR School for Public Health. 

Publications

Selected publications since 2012

Bell et al. (2017) Evaluation of a complex healthcare intervention to increase smoking cessation in pregnant women: interrupted time series analysis with economic evaluation. Tobacco Control. Published Online First: 15 Feb 2017. doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2016-053476. 

Machaira D, Azevedo L, Ells L, Hamilton S, Lingam R, Shucksmith J. (2016) The effectiveness of early intervention, community based programmes that aim to improve social and emotional development, speech, language and nutrition of children from conception to 2 years old: a comprehensive systematic review. (Protocol) Joanna Briggs Institute Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports. 14(5), 44-56.

Cooper L, Ryan C, Ells LJ, Hamilton S, Atkinson G, Cooper K, Johnson MI, Kirwan JP. and Martin, D. (2016).Weight-loss interventions for overweight/obese adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a mixed methods systematic review protocol. JBIDatabase of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 14(5),57-67.

Jones S, Hamilton S, Nicholson A. (2015) The impact of a new palliative care discharge sister role in the acute setting. International Journal of Palliative Nursing 21(12) pp 588-595.

Ells L, Atkinson G, McGowan VJ, Hamilton S, Waller G. (2015) Intermittent fasting interventions for the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults aged 18 years and over: a systematic review of quantitative evidence (Protocol). Joanna Briggs Institute Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports. 13 (10) pp 60-68.

Jones S, Hamilton S. (2013) Introducing a new stop smoking service in an acute UK hospital: a qualitative study to evaluate service user experience. European Journal of Oncology Nursing.

Perry L, Hamilton S, Williams J, Jones S. (2012) Nursing interventions for improving nutritional status of stroke patients: a systematic review. World views in Evidence-based Nursing, 10 (1), pp 17-40.
 

View Sharon Hamilton's Publications on TeesRep