News centre

Help for businesses to recruit digital graduates

13 September 2012 @TeesUniNews

 

Local businesses are being offered support to recruit new staff thanks to the DigitalCity Innovation (DCI) industry placement scheme.

Any kind of small or medium sized business, not just digital businesses, can receive support to place a graduate employee in the digital field.

As digital skills are becoming more and more important for businesses so the expert digital abilities of young people are increasingly needed.

DCI, based at Teesside University, has recognised this and through the industry placement scheme are matching businesses with graduates who have the expertise they need to move forward.

The scheme helps with recruitment costs and gives a 50% subsidy against salary costs for 26 weeks, of up to £135 per week.

Coatsink Software, based at Middlesbrough’s Boho One building, used the scheme earlier this year to employ digital artist Nick Peacock.

Managing director Tom Beardsmore said: “We chose to take part in the DCI industry placement scheme primarily because it provided the perfect support a company of our size needs to take on new staff. “We got valuable help with the recruitment process, which can be extremely costly, together with the confidence that we’d get a skilled employee. “We've always had a great relationship with DCI and this scheme cemented that. It helped us take on a talented new artist and develop his skills along with our abilities and scope as a company.”

Nick added: “I was desperate to find a job in the games industry because of my passion for digital art.

“The industry placement scheme was my way in, and I couldn't be more grateful for it. The people at DigitalCity are willing to help without ever being imposing, allowing me to make the most of the opportunity and really do it justice.”

The DCI industry placement scheme was up in response to demands from small and medium sized businesses in the North East. The placements support businesses in recruiting and employing full-time, permanent graduates with digital skills.

To qualify for the funding it must be a company’s intention to employ the graduate full-time for a minimum of 12 months.

DCI also provides six hours of training in an area relevant for a business’ needs, from project management to communication skills and market intelligence.

Cheryl Evans, project manager for DCI at Teesside University, said: “The industry placement scheme is proving to be really successful with both companies and students.

“It really helps digital businesses to find the right graduate for their company, while at the same time cutting recruitment costs. A 50% subsidy against the graduate’s wage is also an added bonus.

“For the student it gives them their first full-time graduate job with a company that are directly matched with the skills they have to offer.”

If you are a company interested in the DCI industry placement scheme or you would like to find out more information email Cheryl Evans or phone her on (01642) 738888.


In the News

DigitalCity Innovation at Teesside University puts £20m into economy
Gazette Live (Web), 18/09/2012; Evening Gazette, 18/09/2012, p.12
Through a programme of fellowships which support fledgling businesses, and by fostering relationships with local industry, DCI has directly created at least 265 jobs and 190 companies since 2008. Laur


University department reveals local job boost
ITV.com (Web), 17/09/2012
DigitalCity Innovation (DCI) at Teesside University has revealed it has put 20 million back into the economy through job creation.


New recruit thanks to DigitalCity
NEBusiness.co.uk (Web), 14/09/2012
Small or medium-sized business, not necessarily in the digital sector, can receive support to place a graduate employee with digital technology expertise in Teesside University's DCI scheme. The schem


New recruit thanks to DigitalCity
The Journal, 14/09/2012, p.31
Businesses in the North East are being offered support to recruit staff thanks to the DigitalCity Innovation (DCI) industry placement scheme. Small or medium-sized business, not necessarily in the dig