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New standards set in forensic science

09 January 2013 @TeesUniNews

 

Teesside University is helping to set the standard for how forensic science degrees should be taught across the UK.

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) worked with the University to produce new guidance which will enable graduates to flourish in the rapidly expanding subject area.

Following reports by a Home Office Select Committee, Skills for Justice and the Higher Education Academy, QAA was asked by the UK Forensic Science Education Group to produce a subject benchmark statement in forensic science. Subject benchmark statements are part of the UK Quality Code for Higher Education and any university teaching forensic science must meet the benchmark.

Brian Rankin, Head of the Centre for Forensic Investigation at Teesside University and Chair of Standards at professional body The Forensic Science Society, chaired the working group that developed the guidance with QAA.

He said: 'The forensic and affiliated industries need good science graduates and the group worked hard to capture the unique and distinctive nature of forensic science and the way in which a degree in this field should prepare the student for employment.

'The new guidance offers a flexible structure for universities delivering degrees in forensic science, allowing innovation and diversity in course design and continual development in teaching and learning without being prescriptive.'

The working group had strong representation from the forensic science industry ensuring high employer input supporting the eight universities, including Teesside, to produce the benchmark statement.

Brian Rankin added: 'We are proud of Teesside University’s reputation in forensic science and with a philosophy to develop the problem solvers, innovators and leaders of the future, it was a pleasure to chair such a dedicated group of experts.

'To work closely with other universities and organisations to develop the benchmark statement has given us a unique opportunity to strengthen how forensic science degrees are taught at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.'

As well as knowledge and understanding of the core sciences, forensic science graduates are expected to be familiar with the investigative processes of crime scene investigation, laboratory analysis and the evaluation, interpretation and presentation of evidence.

Teesside University offers a range of crime scene science and forensic science degrees which are supported by a crime scene house laboratory, a digital evidence laboratory and a substantial multi-vehicle examination laboratory. Further laboratories are equipped with a full range of optical microscopes, chemical analysis equipment and a DNA suite which allows students to produce DNA profiles.


In the News

Uni helping forensic science standards
Evening Gazette, 18/01/2013, p.19
Teesside University is helping to set the standard for how forensic science degrees should be taught across the UK. The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) worked with the university t