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Ultan Gillen

T:
01642 738297
Job title:
Principal Lecturer (Staff & Resources)
E:
u.gillen@tees.ac.uk
School/department:
School of Social Sciences, Humanities & Law
 
 
Research:
Social Sciences, Humanities & Law research
 
 
ORCID:
0000-0002-3954-8108

About Ultan Gillen

Ultan Gillen

Ultan Gillen
Principal Lecturer (Staff & Resources), School of Social Sciences, Humanities & Law
T: 01642 738297
E: u.gillen@tees.ac.uk
Research: Social Sciences, Humanities & Law research

Ultán Gillen studied for his BA at Queen’s University Belfast, before moving to the University of Oxford where he completed his doctorate on ‘Monarchy, Republic and Empire: Irish Public Opinion and France, c.1787-1804’. Since then he has been a Past and Present Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research, a temporary lecturer at Merton College, Oxford, a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at Queen Mary, University of London, and a Teaching Fellow at the University of Liverpool. He has also taught at Queen’s University, Belfast. He joined Teesside University in January 2011.

At Teesside, his teaching interests in modern European history will include the French Revolution and the history of political thought, as well as contributing to the core courses on Europe since 1870 and War and Society.

Research interests

Ultán’s research interests centre on the French Revolution and its international impact as part of the broader age of revolution in Europe and the Atlantic world. His current research project focuses on counter-revolution in comparative context in the age of the French Revolution and Napoleon, with a particular focus on counter-revolutionaries in France, Britain and Ireland.

Other research interests include the Enlightenment, public opinion and political culture in eighteenth-century Ireland, and the history of political thought. He has published on aspects of political and intellectual life during the age of revolution, including on French and Irish republicanism in the 1790s, the Enlightenment and political culture, and on public opinion, on political clubs, and on counter-revolutionary conceptions of history.