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Rebekah McNaughton

T:
01642 342755
Job title:
Research Associate
E:
r.mcnaughton@tees.ac.uk
School/department:
School of Health & Social Care
 
 
Research:
Health & Social Care research
 
 
ORCID:
0000-0002-9917-6289

About Rebekah McNaughton

Rebekah McNaughton

Rebekah McNaughton
Research Associate, School of Health & Social Care
T: 01642 342755
E: r.mcnaughton@tees.ac.uk
Research: Health & Social Care research

Rebekah is Research Associate (Public Health) in the School of Health & Social Care and a Lecturer in the Research Methods team.

Rebekah completed a BSc (Hons) Psychology and MSc Social Research Methods before joining HSCI in 2006 and the Research Methods team in 2015.  Rebekah's interest in Public Health arose from working as a Healthcare Assistant at James Cook University Hospital, with NHS Professionals (a nurse bank), during her undergraduate degree. Rebekah is also studying, part time, towards a PhD.

Research interests

  • NHS Health Checks
  • Screening
  • Lay understanding of risk
  • Health inequalities
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Normalisation Process Theory
  • Immunisation
  • Children and young people
  • Sexual health 

Current Projects

Rebekah's current projects include:

- An evaluation of the Ur Choice (Relationships and Sex Education) programme in Bradford schools

- An evaluation of Tier 3 weight management services in England.

Publications

Selected publications since 2008

Adams, J., McNaughton, R. J., Wigham, S., Flynn, D., Ternent, L., and Shucksmith, J. (2016) Acceptability of parental financial incentives and quasi-mandatory interventions for preschool vaccinations: Triangulation of findings from three linked studies. PLoS ONE 11(6): e0156843. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/asset?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0156843.PDF

McNaughton, R. J., Adams, J., and Shucksmith J. (2016) Acceptability of financial incentives or quasi-mandatory schemes to increase uptake of immunisations in preschool children in the United Kingdom: qualitative study with parents and service delivery staff. Vaccine, 34(19), 2259-2266.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X16002991

Adams, J., Bateman, B., Becker, F., Cresswell, T., Flynn, D., McNaughton, R., Oluboyede, Y., Robalino, S., Ternent, L., Gardner Sood, B., Michie, S., Shucksmith, J., Sniehotta, F.F., and Wigham, S. (2015) Effectiveness and acceptability of parental financial incentives and quasi-mandatory schemes for increasing uptake of vaccinations in preschool children: systematic review, qualitative study and discrete choice experiment. Health Technology Assessment, 19(94).
http://www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.uk/hta/volume-19/issue-94#abstract 

McNaughton, R.J. and Shucksmith, J. (2015) Reasons for non-compliance with intervention following identification of ‘high risk’ status in the NHS Health Check programme. Journal of Public Health, 37(2), 218-225.
http://jpubhealth.oxfordjournals.org/content/37/2/218 

McNaughton, R.J. and Shucksmith, J. (2014) Utilization of Heat Disease Prevention Services. In: Cockerham, W.C., Dingwall, R. and Quah, S.R. (eds.) The Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Health, Illness, Behaviour, and Society. London: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

McNaughton, R.J., Oswald, N.T., Shucksmith, J.S., Heywood, P.J., and Watson, P.S. (2011) Making a success of providing NHS Health Checks in community pharmacies across the Tees Valley: a qualitative study. BMC Health Services Research, 11, 222.
http://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6963-11-222 

View Rebekah McNaughton's Publications on TeesRep