Research Topics 2016-2017

The list of research topics available for 2016-17 can be found below.

  • For a summary of the different funding routes available, please click here.
  • You can filter the list of topics below to search for opportunities within a particular funding route.
  • Specific details about each opportunity and how to apply can be found by clicking on the project title.
  • Please note that to maximise choice and quality of applications, the number of topics listed below slightly exceeds the number of final places that will be available.
  • Contact information and more details about the research interests of each Director of Studies can be found by clicking on each individual staff member.
  • The closing date for applications is at 23:59 on the date specified.
  • Shortlisting and interviews will be arranged early in the new year for both funding routes - successful candidates will be contacted with further information.
  • The start date for University Research Studentships is Monday 6th February 2017.
  • For academic enquiries, please contact the relevant Director of Studies in the first instance. For administrative queries, please contact pgradmissions@tees.ac.uk.


View only Graduate tutor projects View only Studentship projects   |    Clear all search filters

26 available projects
Title Key Info Director of study

Improving healthcare students' understanding of chronic pain management
(GT-SOHSC1)

Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent conditions in the UK and people with chronic pain are heavy consumers of a wide variety of health and social care resources. Thus, health and social care students from all clinical backgrounds will deal with people with chronic pain in their career. Current research suggests that undergraduate/pre-registration education for healthcare requires improvement to meet the standards outlined in guidelines of good clinical practice for chronic pain management. Therefore, this project will aim to explore the understanding of chronic pain management of students from nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and social work; and investigate ways of improving this. A mixed-methods design combining qualitative and quantitative methods would be most appropriate.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Denis Martin

Iodine and fluorine: is there any interaction?
(GT-SOHSC2)

Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) is still a major public health issue, affecting two billion people globally. IDD can lead to maternal and foetal hypothyroidism and impair neurological development of the foetus. Fluoride, which has been included in toothpastes and mouthwashes to reduce dental decay, might be an iodide antagonist that competes with iodide absorption and utilisation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of fluoride exposure on thyroid function in pregnant women. The graduate tutor will undertake systematic reviews and collect clinical and demographical data from pregnant women living in fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas during the first and last trimesters.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Vida Zohoori

Development of an online weight management programme for children
(GT-SOHSC3)

The aim of this programme is to develop and conduct a formative evaluation of a novel, interactive, family based multicomponent online weight management programme for overweight children aged 4-11 years. This research will be undertaken in close collaboration with the school of computing who will lead the technology development. The programme will involve: reviewing the evidence base for effective e-weight management interventions for children; conducting in-depth focus groups with a range of key stakeholders to explore views on programme content, weight management support requirements, barriers and facilitators to programme engagement, views and use of different forms of online functionality, digital gaming concepts and prototypes; developing the programme content and wireframe for a new online weight management programme. The successful candidate will be expected to work with a wide range of stakeholders including collaborating academics, children, clinicians, weight management service providers and commissioners.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Dr Louisa Ells

An exploration and conceptualization of role boundaries between registered nurses and unregistered healthcare support workers
(GT-SOHSC4)

Unregistered nursing support workers such as Health Care Assistants (HCAs) now undertake many tasks that were exclusively encompassed within the role of registered nurses. Very little research has been done to explore the complexities of how role and task boundaries between registered nurses and unregistered support workers are negotiated within acute hospital wards yet such research is vital for informing future workforce developments. This study will focus particularly on clinical monitoring of acutely ill patients in hospital wards. The study will include a systematic scoping review to clarify working definitions and underpinning concepts. The review will inform the development of a mixed methods study which is likely to include qualitative interviews and focus groups with a range of stakeholders including clinical staff, NHS managers and patients.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Dr Sharon Hamilton

Behaviour change interventions to increase uptake of cancer screening initiatives
(GT-SOHSC5)

The aim of the project is to explore the impact of interventions for increasing uptake for screening of cervical cancer and colorectal cancer. This will be a mixed methods study which aims to address the following objectives: carry out a systematic review to investigate the effectiveness of behaviour change interventions for increasing patient uptake of cancer screening initiatives; compare the effectiveness of an online survey-based intervention utilising anticipated regret theory at increasing uptake of cancer screening compared with a nurse-led brief intervention; carry out a small pilot study to identify barriers and facilitators of the interventions; conduct qualitative interviews with participants and clinical staff (oncologists, GPs and nurses) to assess the feasibility and acceptability of behaviour change interventions aimed at increasing uptake of cancer screening initiatives; make recommendations for the development of a pilot feasibility study.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Dr Grant McGeechan

What are the key organizational cultural and working environment factors impacting on registered nurses’ ability to deliver safe, quality and compassionate care?
(GT-SOHSC6)

The research will build on the feasibility study undertaken by McSherry et al., (2015) to develop and test a Cultural Health Check (CHC) toolkit designed to assist healthcare workers and organisations in the provision of safe, compassionate and dignified care for older people. This research will explore the organisational and working environment factors that impact on a registered nurse’s ability to deliver safe, quality and compassionate care. There will be a focus on the following areas: job satisfaction, support, workforce and staffing, care and compassion, health and wellbeing.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Robert McSherry

Vascular imaging and endothelial structure and function
(GT-SOHSC7)

The research programme will focus on measurement issues for ultrasound imaging of vascular structure and function. Professor Atkinson has developed a novel approach to quantifying the change in arterial diameter in response to a hyperaemic stimulus. The repeatability of measurements will, for the first time, be examined following appropriate adjustment for the influence of initial artery diameter. The prognostic utility of flow-mediated dilation will be explored. The unique aspects of this is that the study will be undertaken under the “TRIPOD” framework and flow-mediated dilation data will be allometrically-adjusted. Professor Atkinson already has access to a large dataset for this study to be undertaken. There will be an investigation of the effects of exercise on allomteric-adjusted measurements of flow-mediated dilation. For the first time, both the acute and chronic (6 weeks of exercise training) effects of exercise on allometric-adjusted measurements of flow-mediated dilation will be examined.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Greg Atkinson

Is Embedded Research the new way to create and share knowledge between practice and academe?
(GT-SOHSC8)

Despite three decades of translational research efforts, the time-lag between evidence creation and its uptake in practice is estimated to be 17 years. There are many factors that impeded evidence use (performance pressures and workrounds, financial constraints, poor training, lack of awareness that the evidence exists, or the inability to understand and apply its key messages). There is much research into these barriers. However, a new perspective suggests that the time-lag exists because research in now created in places that are different from where it will be used (i.e. in Universities as opposed to clinical and other practice settings). This denies practitioners the opportunities to shape the research in helpful ways as it is produced (to increase its usefulness) and research created elsewhere can then seem as it is imposed on already busy people who cannot understand its benefit. One way round this is to locate researchers within practice and policy contexts to undertake research so that the people who will use the findings are part of the process. The thesis will address the following main questions: in what ways are researchers embedded in health and wellbeing settings; what may be gained by co-locating researchers with practitioners. The study will use qualitative methods.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Rosemary Rushmer

BIM Level 4 and Framework Development for Polices and Use Cases
(GT-SSE1)

As of 2016 UK government mandated use of Building Information Modeling (BIM) level 2 on its construction projects. The government strategic plan for Digital Built Britain also envisions use of BIM level 3 as the next stage of BIM implementation in facility management. However, what lies beyond BIM level 3 remains largely unknown. Integration of multiple building information models into neighbourhood and future city level information management systems, potential national level infrastructure information management, dealing with big data associated with such systems and internet of things to feed real time model inputs and control, are only some of the potential evolutionary paths. A comprehensive framework and recommendations how future BIM level 4+ systems should look like and what are their underpinning ingredients are the scope of this multidisciplinary PhD. A successful candidate should be experienced in BIM applications with background in Construction Project Management or related field.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Nashwan Dawood

Process Intensification for Hydrogen Production using Catalytic Membrane Reactors (CMRs)
(GT-SSE2)

Conventional processes (steam reforming of hydrocarbons) account for as much 90% of the hydrogen produced globally and the production of Methanol, Ammonia, SNG are almost exclusively produced using this conventional flowsheet. These processes are endothermic with high energy consumption footprint, resulting in high emissions of CO2 per every ton of Hydrogen produced. Process Intensification strategies, such as integrating a CMR system (for separating Hydrogen as it is generated) can significantly overcome equilibrium constraints, allowing the reaction to proceed at lower temperatures while maintaining the same yields of Hydrogen. In this project, we can explore the fabrication of a CMR using standard Pd-films, optimize the fluxes of Hydrogen, while maintaining lower reaction temperatures, and enhance the long term stability towards the CMR system.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Dr Venkatesan Krishnan

Sensor design and development - combined technologies for Multi-phase flow measurement
(GT-SSE3)

Pulverised coal flow measurement is vital in coal fired power station to achieve optimised combustion control and reduce pollution. In iron making, pulverised coal is used to reduce cost of coke, and the flow balance control is essential for saving raw material, reducing particulate emission, and for safe operation. The techniques are also applied to process industries dealing with cement, flour, washing powder, other particulate and granular material such as in mining and pharmaceutical sectors. Worldwide, there is a huge market for such applications. At present, different method have their limits and drawbacks. The proposed concept is to use combined technologies to maximise the advantages and compensate the weakness of individual techniques.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Dr Jian Yong Zhang

Application of electrical potential to alter and control wettability of hydrocarbon reservoir to favourable wettability
(GT-SSE4)

Research Proposal Rational: This project adopts a novel technique to alter and control the wettability of hydrocarbon reservoir rocks to favourable wettability where more hydrocarbons can be extracted effectively eco-friendly , and economically. Aim and Objective: The objectives of the project are as follow: · Investigate the application of no external fluid injection theory in enhance oil recovery for the first time. · Feasibility study of electrical potential in changing and controlling the rock surface wettability · Changing and controlling the wettability to favourable wettability to increase oil production · Stop injection of see water /gas / and surfactant into reservoir to boost the hydrocarbon production for wettability alteration · Protect the environment from waste water disposal

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Dr Sina Rezaei-Gomari

From Data Rich to Information Rich in a manufacturing Development environment
(GT-SSE5)

The proposed project sets out to specifically address how to convert the vast amounts of manufacturing data produced in bioprocess development into understandable, actionable information with specific application in the area of pharmaceutical process development. Changes in the expectation of regulatory bodies have necessitated pharmaceutical companies to fundamentally change the manufacturing philosophy of pharmaceutical products from one where consistency of operation leads to quality assurance to one where maximum information and understanding gives assurance with commensurate appreciation of the risk of deviation. The main objectives of the research proposal are to: To build agent-augmented co-space for improving human involvement in data collection, processing and knowledge exploitation. Here a multi-agent platform will be developed to handle the complex high dimensional diverse data structures, process the data and present to the user data that is most likely to offer them bioprocess insight. Here the agents act as a replacement for the data / systems analyst and significantly ease the processing task. To develop belief systems for representation and extraction of actionable knowledge from multiple heterogeneous resources. The link between complex data and the process related information consists of multiple steps and interactions serving to make the gaining of process insight difficult and there is a further step between indications from data and design decisions taken by the bioscientist. The second objective is to develop the link between process observation and the indication of design decisions to offer options for action. To implement and test the proposed research with PAT in a number of pharmaceutical applications. Here the facilities of the National Biologics Manufacturing Centre will provide in the first instance data to design and develop the algorithms which will satisfy the objectives above and then to provide test processes to assess and verify the functionality of the user tool. The proposed project is ideally suited to someone with engineering or science background and has a strong capability from an ICT perspective

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Gary Montague

Hydrogen as transport fuel of the future
(GT-SSE6)

The main aim of this research is to develop new and advanced high-capacity hydrogen storage materials and technologies in order to design an efficient portable hydrogen storage device. The major objectives are: (i) synthesis of new functionalised mesoporous materials using MCM-41 and SBA-15 as templates; (ii) methodical characterisation to establish their structure-H2 adsorption capacity relationship and to choose the most promising candidate; (iii) design the portable H2 storage device based on microreactor technology, (iv) engine modifications to use H2 as fuel. Two series of materials will be developed: (a) by metal oxide impregnation on MCM-41; (b) by using SBA-15 to prepare highly ordered porous carbon materials. The storage device will be designed and optimised for H2 adsorption capacity, by CFD module of COMSOL Multiphysics. A hydrogen internal combustion engine will be designed as a modified version of the traditional gasoline-powered internal combustion engine.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Maria Olea

High Performance Drive Systems
(GT-SSE7)

Electric drive systems are employed in various industrial plants as well as hybrid and electric vehicles. This research area has been identified as one where EPSRC aim to build critical mass and stimulate novel and transformative underpinning research This project will investigate novel system configurations that are aimed at improving efficiency and reliability. The project, which is within TU’s research grand challenge theme of Energy and Environment, is multidisciplinary in nature. The work will involve electromagnetic and thermal design, electric power conversion, control, and energy management schemes.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Dr Essam Hamdi

Performance improvement in modelling Gas-Condensate reservoirs
(GT-SSE8)

Productivity improvement challenges in Gas-Condensate reservoirs has been a long time issue in the petroleum industry. This challenge is further complicated by lack of modelling tools that quickly predicts the performance of any improved/enhanced oil recovery (IOR/EOR) methods in this candidate reservoir. The traditional approach is the use of numerical reservoir simulations with all its huge data input requirements difficulties and time consuming issues that limits the application. It is the aim of this study to develop new performance modelling approaches and as well improve on current methods. This will help to improve skills in both prediction and production of Gas-Condensate reservoirs in the North Sea.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Dr Ugwu Johnson

The New English Nationalism: Class, culture, and the politics of the future
(GT-SSSBL1)

Over the last ten years in Britain there has been a significant growth in support for ‘far right’ political movements. We have also seen centrist political parties quietly dispense with their old commitments to multiculturalism and the free movement of people. Immigration, economic migration, the defence of national culture, and growing competition in labour markets are now at the centre of British politics. This scholarship focuses upon the rise of the nationalist right-wing in the present conjuncture. The successful applicant will be expected to address a broad range of issues that appear connected to the growth of English nationalism. These might include economic restructuring and its effect upon the white working class; the shifting politics of class; the geopolitical situation, environmental change, and new migrant flows from south to north and from east to west; popular perceptions of multiculturalism; dissatisfaction with metropolitan elites; fear, anxiety, and their effects; growing religious and ethnic diversity, and the uninspiring nature of contemporary parliamentary politics. Using qualitative or quantitative methods, the successful applicant will advance our understanding of changing social and political attitudes, and illuminate the shifting relationship that exists between the people and the state.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Simon Winlow

Digital Technology in Sport and Exercise Science
(GT-SSSBL2)

Digital technologies are becoming integral to the way in which sport and exercise practitioners work. At Teesside, we work with external partners to innovate, research, develop and evaluate the use of these technologies in a range of settings (e.g. primary schools, deprived areas and elite-level professional sport clubs) in order to reduce injury in athletes and to improve health in the general population by making exercise more enjoyable. We are looking for a talented graduate to join our team. They will design, implement and lead innovative studies into the use of digital technology for exercise. The ideal candidate would have both coding and applied sport science experience but we would welcome excellent applicants from either background, as long as there is a desire to broaden their skills.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Professor Iain Spears

Talent Management and Employability
(GT-SSSBL3)

This project will explore global talent management and the talent pipeline. Due to globalization, the development of technology and transportation have provided a distinctive and valuable opportunity for globally mobile talents to bring along and offer their professional skills, knowledge and networks to maximize organizational and regional competitive advantage. However, developing and retaining talent in some sectors and regions has become challenging. There is concern over the establishment and development of the talent pipeline. This project aims to explore and examine the concept of global talent management, global mobile talent and talent pipeline development, in particular, their establishment and development patterns, associated challenges, and impacts.

Please see the University's Job Vacancies webpage for full details of this position and to apply.

*Please note that Graduate Tutor adverts and application are pending and will appear shortly*

Funding route Graduate Tutor


Deadline
Sunday 18th December

Dr Xiaoxian Zhu

Polymer-supported Catalysts for H2 Production
(ST-SSE1)

The development of new materials capable of harnessing energy in a clean and sustainable manner is a key challenge of our society. Sunlight is the most abundant energy source, and hydrogen production from solar water splitting would allow the generation of a renewable, storable and transportable fuel. Photocatalysts for hydrogen production are mostly based on inorganic materials or molecules. On the other hand, organic polymers have been widely used for light harvesting in organic photovoltaics, but their use in light-driven water splitting is still unexplored. The aim of this project is to combine conjugated organic polymers, whose optical and electrical properties can be tuned by modifying their building blocks, with molecular catalysts based on abundant metals. This multidisciplinary project involves the design, synthesis and characterisation of the catalysts, as well as kinetic and mechanistic studies using time resolved spectroscopies.

Please click here for further details of the application process, including the link to apply for this opportunity

Funding route RDS Studentship


Deadline
Monday 9th January 2017

Dr Anna Reynal

Development of a New Waste Gas Biofilter Using Sustainable Biochar as The Support Medium
(ST-SSE2)

Biochar is recognised for its potential for carbon capture, renewable energy production and contaminant (bio)remediation. The aim of this multidisciplinary project is to design, build and test a novel trickling bed filter for the treatment of malodorant and polluting waste gases. The bed will be constructed from sustainably sourced biochar as a support medium for the active bacterial phase to hopefully produce a greener solution with enhanced efficiency for waste gas clean up. The project is: a green alternative to the use of expensive consumables and often hazardous solvents; multidisciplinary to ensure a correct mix of academic support; and, intended to ensure that Teesside University matches the considerable academic interest in the topic by renowned universities such as Newcastle and Imperial College.

Please click here for further details of the application process, including the link to apply for this opportunity

Funding route RDS Studentship


Deadline
Monday 9th January 2017

Dr Komang Ralebitso-Senior

Biochar-based bioenergy systems
(ST-SSE3)

Biochar technologies have a critical role to play in sustainable technology development, climate change mitigation and the circular economy. Building on our recent work in the Pyrochar project (www.pyrochar.eu) this project will develop the role that biochar systems have to play in resource recovery and energy generation. The project will focus on engineering solutions for biochar systems including the activation of biochar to be used and tested as catalyst for hemicellulose hydrolysis and esterification of fatty acids for energy recovery and the production of value-added products. There is scope within the project to explore the role of biochar applications beyond agriculture, including contaminated land remediation, coupled bioremediation-bioenergy systems and other value-added carbon applications.

Please click here for further details of the application process, including the link to apply for this opportunity

Funding route RDS Studentship


Deadline
Monday 9th January 2017

Dr Chris Ennis

Building a bio-economy from waste: making lactic acid from waste biomass
(ST-SSE4)

The project aim is to use industrial waste feedstock to produce ethyl lactate (EL), an environmentally benign biosolvent. This will then be exploited as a substrate to produce racemic lactic acid (rac-LA) for subsequent manufacture of thermally stable, industrially robust and commercially competitive polylactic acid (PLA)-based bioplastics. This is central to the manufacturing of robust thermally stable PLA-based bioplastics with real competitive potential against non-sustainable alternatives such as PET. Despite this potential, the PLA’s industrial growth is limited by two key factors: feedstock and thermal stability. Also, PLA manufactured from L-LA has significant limitations in applications over 60 ⁰C due to its largely amorphous structure and crystallinity. Physical blending of L- and D-PLA polymers produces highly regular stereo-complex materials with significantly increased crystallinity and thermal stability. Thus expansion and development of current and new knowledge on how lactic acid bacteria generate rac-LA, and the optimum growth/process conditions, should result in a more streamlined pathway for PLA-derived bioplastics with potential to be more cost-effective and thermally stable. The objectives of the project are as follows: • To address the commercial potential of EL as an emerging ‘green solvent’. • To investigate the microbiological pathways that produce a racemic mixture of D- and L-lactic acid (rac-LA). • To investigate sources of waste biomass as a renewable substrate for commercially and sustainably competitive PLA-based bioplastics.

Please click here for further details of the application process, including the link to apply for this opportunity

Funding route RDS Studentship


Deadline
Monday 9th January 2017

Dr Helen Carney

Technologies, regulatory frameworks and business models for the near future deployment of energy storage systems in electricity networks
(ST-SSE5)

Distributed generation (DG), also known as embedded or dispersed generation, is electricity generating plant that is connected to a distribution network rather than the transmission network. There are many types and sizes of DG, including Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plants, wind farms, hydro-electric power and Photovoltaics (PV). In recent years a dramatic growth in the number of distributed generators seeking to connect to distribution networks has been driven by national and international policies related to climate change and reducing CO2 emissions. The growth in DG is causing increasing problems for electricity distribution networks in most developed countries. “Energy storage can help manage the large-scale deployment of intermittent generation. Storage technologies have the potential to substitute for new peaking generation plant and allow the electricity network to handle increasing power flows” (ERP 2011, REA 2015). However apart from Pumped Hydroelectric Storage (PHS), research suggests that most Electric Energy Storage (EES) technologies are not cost-effective or mature enough for widespread implementation within the current large network operation regulation and energy market frame (Lou et al 2014). Given that DG is set to continue rising, while the cost of EES is falling further exploration of the benefits brought to power system operation by utilising EES technologies is required to inform the adaptation of regulatory frameworks and underpin business models for EES. In this context, the aim of this study will identify the most promising EES storage technologies, regulatory frameworks and business models for the near future deployment of energy storage systems in electricity networks with a particular focus on the UK.

Please click here for further details of the application process, including the link to apply for this opportunity

Funding route RDS Studentship


Deadline
Monday 9th January 2017

Dr Tracey Crosbie

Multidisciplinary approaches to the investigation of preservation processes at the Roman Site of Vindolanda, Northumberland, UK
(ST-SSE6)

Archaeological landscapes and environments are extremely complex and diverse systems. Vindolanda, situated in Northumberland, UK, is part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage site and has remarkable preservation of artefacts of international significance including leather, writing tablets and bones. Vindolanda is a waterlogged site and contains anoxic layers which often aid in the preservation of these important artefacts. This PhD position, in collaboration with the Vindolanda Trust, will aim to i) enhance our understanding of preservation processes and ii) explore chemical and microbial factors that impact on preservation. The successful application will be required to use a range of chemical and microbial techniques to analyse samples within the laboratory and field setting. Applicants should hold, or be about to receive, a strong BSc (Hons) degree within the Biosciences, Archaeological Science or an MSc within a related area, and have theoretical and practical knowledge of microbiology, molecular biology and/or chemistry laboratories.

Please click here for further details of the application process, including the link to apply for this opportunity

Funding route RDS Studentship


Deadline
Monday 9th January 2017

Dr Gillian Taylor

Integrating differential ratings of perceived exertion into the training monitoring procedures of team sports
(ST-SSSBL1)

Training load monitoring is now widely adopted in team sports and recent work shows that differential ratings of perceived exertion (dRPE) provide a sensitive evaluation of the physical demands associated with team-sport matches and training (Weston et al., 2015; McLaren et al., 2016). However, the real-world effectiveness of dRPE as a measure of training load prescription and evaluation has yet to be fully understood. For example, the increased number of data collection points associated with dRPE requires more time for interpretation and feedback when compared to traditional measures. By exploiting new mobile and cloud-based technologies to support the process, this programme of research aims to investigate how dRPE can be successfully implemented into the daily working practices of those responsible for the prescription and monitoring of team-sport training loads. This project is fulltime and based at Teesside University’s Middlesbrough campus although some travel may be required to a range of sporting clubs. This post will be suitable for someone with a background in Sport and Exercise.

Please click here for further details of the application process, including the link to apply for this opportunity

Funding route RDS Studentship


Deadline
Monday 9th January 2017

Dr Matthew Weston