Projects

Increasing efficiency in fried food production: oil take-up, energy use and shelf-life

Teesside University is collaborating with Sainsbury’s on a £1 million project to find ways to cut the amount of fat used in fried food.

Increasing efficiency in fried food production: oil take-up, energy use and shelf-life

As well as improving efficiency and reducing carbon output, the three-year project could also result in healthier crisps and snacks. The University will work with Sainsbury’s and members of its supply chain to explore different ways to improve efficiency and reduce the take up of oil in fried food.

Teesside University will provide expertise in food science, chemistry and sustainable technology to optimise the management of oil in the production process. The five main aims of the project are to:

• reduce oil use and oil degradation
• reduce production costs through increased productivity and efficiency
• increase shelf life of crisps and ambient snacks and thereby reduce supply chain waste
• reduce product oil pick-up during frying
• find options for oil and energy reuse.

The first year of the project will predominantly take place at Teesside University and will involve a wide range of research and experimentation. In the second year, ideas that have been developed in the laboratories will be upscaled and tested in the factories of Sainsbury’s industrial partners. In the final year of the project, the results will be analysed and published and any process or innovations which have been developed will be patented. At all stages of the process, taste panels will be used to assess the impact upon the consumer.

The Teesside University research project will be led by Senior Lecturer in Energy Management, Garry Evans along with Dr Jibin He, Dr Gillian Taylor, Dr Liam O’Hare and Shirley O’Hare.

The project is part-funded by the Technology Strategy Board.

Project Duration: 3 years
Project Start: May 2013
Academic Lead: Garry Evans




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