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Tim Thompson

Tim Thompson

About Tim Thompson

Tim Thompson is a Professor of Applied Biological Anthropology in the School of Science & Engineering. In 2014, Tim was awarded a prestigious National Teaching Fellowship by the Higher Education Academy for excellence in teaching and support for learning in higher education.

Before coming to Teesside, Tim studied for his PhD at the University of Sheffield (Faculty of Medicine) and was a Lecturer in Forensic Anthropology at the University of Dundee. 

Tim has published over 50 papers in peer-reviewed journals and books and is a renowned expert on heat-induced apatite and crystallinity changes in bone - he has recently published the book 'The Archaeology of Cremation: Burned Human Remains in Funerary Studies'. Prior to this he was co-author of 'Human Identity and Identification' with Dr Rebecca Gowland (Durham University) and senior editor for the book 'Forensic Human Identification'. 

At Teesside, he is actively involved in undertaking and fostering research. On top of developing his own research team and striving to create an environment for them to successfully work and develop in, Tim has Chaired both the School of Science & Engineering Research Ethics and Research Degrees Committees. Currently he Chairs the University Research Ethics and Integrity Committee and the University Research Degrees Committee. He also sits on the University Research Policy Committee. 

Externally, he is on the editorial boards for the 'Journal of Forensic Sciences', 'Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine' and 'Human Remains and Violence: an Interdisciplinary Journal'. He has recently been appointed as Editor-in-Chief of the journal 'Science & Justice'. He is also a Fellow of the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences and the Royal Anthropological Institute, and is a practicing forensic anthropologist who has worked at home and abroad in a variety of forensic contexts.

Research interests and activities

Tim's main areas of research focus on the human body and how it changes, particularly in the modern context. Here, most of his research examines the effects of burning on the skeleton and the development of new analytical tools to examine this challenging biomaterial through our 'Analytical Instrumentation, Measurement and Control Engineering' research theme. Tim is also interested the recording and visualisation of forensic evidence and heritage artefacts, and the resolution of commingled graves from contexts of mass violence.
Various projects are currently underway in all of these areas, involving leading researchers in a variety of UK and overseas academic institutions.

PhD supervision
Tim is Director of Studies on several doctoral projects being offered in the Technology Futures Institute and would like to encourage applications from prospective students.  Please submit an application online, or for further information, contact Tim directly.

Enterprise interest and activities

Tim acts as a consultant forensic anthropologist for the police, mainly in the North-East of England.

Tim is also the Managing Director of anthronomics a spin-out company from Teesside University which creates a range of exciting and effective digital tools and software for all those studying, teaching, researching and working with skeletal remains.
www.anthronomics.com

In the news

  • Mysteries of Stonehenge
    Stonehenge: The Final Mystery, Channel 5, 5/5/17
    Professor Tim Thompson features in this television documentary which aims to uncover the mysteries surrounding Stonehenge and the discovery of an ancient burial site


  • Bodies of Evidence: Forensic Anthropology Talk and Workshop
    What's on in The North East, 24/2/2017
    Ripon Museum is launching its new 2017 programme, Tim Thompson, rofessor of forensic anthropology at Teesside University is going to show how crime scene investigation techniques give clues to history


  • BBC Radio York, Jonathan Cowap
    BBC Radio York, 21/2/2017
    Tim Thompson talk at the Ripon Workhouse Museum.


  • How crime scene investigation techniques give clues to history
    North Yorkshire Advertiser (Web)12/02/2017:Northern Echo (Web) 12/02/2017: Ripon Today, 12/2/2017; Harrogate Advertiser, 13/2/2017; Wetherby News, 13/2/2017: North Yorkshire News, 13/2/2017; Harrogate Advertiser, 16/2/2017; Yorkshire Post, 17/2/2017
    Ripon Museum is launching its new 2017 programme, Tim Thompson, rofessor of forensic anthropology at Teesside University is going to show how crime scene investigation techniques give clues to history


  • Expert reveals what police in Ben Needham search expect to find
    Mirror.co.uk, 16/09/2016; irish Mirror, 16/09/2016; Daily Mirror, 17/09/2016; Daily Mirror Eire, 17/09/2016;
    Teeside University Professor Tim Thompson talks about the Ben Needham latest developments.


  • Phone access to digitised models of bones
    Evening Gazette (teesside) 25.07.16:
    TEESSIDE University academic Tim Thompson, Professor of Applied Biological Anthropology has found a digital solution to an unusual problem -a shortage of bones and skeletons for teaching purposes.


  • How to succeed at publishing and funding applications in forensic science
    Connect Innovate UK, 19/01/2016
    Professor Tim Thompson will speak at the Society of Forensic Sciences workshop.


  • Leading forensic anthropologist receives prestigious National Teaching Fellowship
    Vigilance The Security Magazine, 28/10/2014
    Dr Tim Thompson has been presented with a prestigious National Teaching fellowship for his revolutionary methods into teaching bone identification.


  • Software will change this teaching forever
    Evening Gazette, 12/05/14, P.17
    Leading forensic anthropologist Dr Tim Thompson, from Teesside University, launched Anthronomics, which is set to revolutionise the way bone identification is taught across the globe.


  • Ten bodies examined after remains discovered
    Hull Daily Mail, 03/02/2014, p.39
    Dr Tim Thompson comments on DNA testing being carried out on 10 bodies after remains were discovered under rocks in Russia.


  • Gaul's Bell will ring once more
    Hull Daily Mail, 01/02/2014
    Tim Thompson, Reader in biological and forensic anthropology in Teesside University's School of Science & Engineering, comments on the use of DNA to identify remains. It comes four decades after a tra


  • The bone collector goes digital
    Evening Gazette (Teesside), 16/09/2013
    With the help of a grant from the Teesside University Enterprise Development Fund, Dr Tim Thompson has developed a business plan to digitalise the process of identifying bones.


  • Teesside University lecturer on forensic anthropology
    BBC Radio Tees, Neil Green, 10/04/2013, 16:52:03
    Tim Thompson comments.


  • Teesside University lecturer on forensic anthropology
    BBC Radio Tees, Neil Green, 10/04/2013, 16:52:03
    Tim Thompson comments.


  • Teesside University academic is poised to launch spin-out company
    BQ (Business Quarter North East), 04/01/2013, p.24
    Teesside University Dr Tim Thompson is accustomed to sharing his forensics knowledge and expertise with the police, from dealing with a recent crime to archaeological remains. Now with a grant from Te


  • Uni expert leading the way
    Evening Gazette, 21/01/2013, p.9
    A leading Teesside University forensic anthropologist is set to revolutionise the way bone identification is taught across the globe. Dr Tim Thompson has collaborated with digital experts Landslide St


  • Science faces a shortage of skeletons
    The Week, 19/01/2013, p.19
    Science faces a shortage of skeletons It is estimated that 100 billion people have lived and died -yet scientists are short of bones, says The Independent. Owing to social taboos and strict laws gover


  • Forensic scientists need skeletons to train - but they're down to bare bones
    The Independent, 05/01/2013, p.18; The Independent (Web), 04/01/2013
    Considering scientists estimate that the number of people who have lived - and died - now comfortably exceeds 100 billion individuals, it would seem fair to assume that there was no shortage of one of