Undergraduate study
Chemical Engineering with Industry (with Foundation Year)

Chemical Engineering with Industry (with Foundation Year)
BEng (Hons)

H816 BEng/CInFY

 
 

Course overview

This degree includes an integrated foundation year for you if you don’t have the appropriate subjects and/or grades for direct entry to year 1 of the degree. The foundation year helps you develop your knowledge in mathematics and other important subjects to enable you to proceed confidently through the remainder of the programme.

Chemical engineers are involved in a diverse range of work from extracting oil and gas, to designing and building cleaner nuclear power plants. Skilled engineers are highly sought and can achieve high earnings.

Professional accreditation

Engineering Council accredited degree This degree is accredited by the Institution of Chemical Engineers under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council. Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC).

This accredited degree will provide you with the BEng-level underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

 

Course details

In the foundation year (Year 0) you study a range of mathematics and fundamental science and engineering subjects, and you develop important practical laboratory skills to prepare you for the remainder of your programme. The content of the remaining years of this programme is identical to the content of our BEng (Hons) Chemical Engineering degree.

The foundation year of this programme is sufficiently broad in content to provide you with the flexibility to change degree subjects after you successfully complete the foundation year.

If your ultimate aim is to graduate with a master’s degree rather than a BEng degree, after successfully completing the foundation year, and providing you achieve excellent grades, you have the option of joining one of our integrated master’s degrees leading to the award of an MEng (Hons) degree.

Course structure

Year 0 (foundation year) core modules

Engineering in Practice

Engineering Principles

Engineering the Future

Global Grand Challenges

This module focuses on how science can help address some of the biggest global Grand Challenges that face society. This reflects the University’s focus on externally facing research that makes a real, practical difference to the lives of people and the success of businesses and economies.

You work on a project in a group, to enabling you to develop innovative answers to some of the biggest issues of our time based on five thematic areas – health and wellbeing, resilient and secure societies, digital and creative economy, sustainable environments and learning for the 21st century.

Materials Science

Mathematics in Engineering

 

Year 1 core modules

Engineering Mathematics

This module introduces the range of mathematical skills that are relevant to an engineering degree. You revisit and develop your knowledge of the fundamentals of algebra, trigonometry and basic statistics. The central ideas of vectors, matrices, complex numbers, and differential and integral calculus are also examined.

Throughout the module you develop a range of mathematical skills and techniques fundamental to the solution of engineering problems. You also advance your skills in selecting and applying mathematical techniques.

This module is delivered through a combination of lectures and tutorial sessions.

Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics

You gain a fundamental knowledge of fluid flow through pipe-work systems and the associated design tasks. You are introduced to the techniques used to predict the behaviour of fluids in Chemical Engineering applications and investigate the differences between Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluids.

Mass and Energy Balances

This is one of the most important modules for you. The main tools employed in the analysis of processes involve the use of balances to look at material and energy flow in to and out of the process.

You look at the concepts of laws of conservation of mass and energy through a process. You develop strategies for setting up and solving mass and energy balance problems related to chemical and biochemical processes. In addition you look at the use of steam tables for solving energy balance problems. You also study the use of recycles, purges and the limits of conversion in selecting reacting systems as complications that must be dealt with.

Practical Skills for Chemical Engineers

You work in a team in order to solve a process industry based problem. It gives you an understanding of your own knowledge and limitations and the importance of working with other people to solve a chemical engineering based problem. You gain a fundamental understanding of the operation of the chemical industry with respect to commercial project delivery; health and safety and ethical considerations.

Science for Chemical Engineers

This module introduces a range of key concepts in chemistry which provide a basis for understanding subsequent study in areas including analysing, synthesising and identifying compounds, and industrial production.

You learn about the nature of matter and why different substances behave the way they do. Understanding the properties of a substance is essential whether you’re designing a plant to manufacture it on a multi-tonne scale or working out how to alter its structure to improve its properties, for example as a drug or construction material. You also learn how the fundamental principles of chemical equilibrium, energetics and reaction rate are developed, and come to understand the prediction of reaction behaviour when process conditions are changed.

Thermodynamics for Chemical Engineers

 

Year 2 core modules

Applied Mathematical Methods

Chemical Process Design

This module provides you with the opportunity to solve industrially relevant process design problems as part of a team. You develop employability skills such as project management, presentation of work, research and commercial awareness to support problem solving in a technical context.

Control and Simulation

You learn about the importance of control systems in industrial production processes, and describe fundamental concepts of linear control including feedback, Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control, system dynamic response and controller tuning.

Mathematical modeling of systems based upon rate and balance equations are demonstrated, together with methods of designing feedback controllers. You use computer software to develop models of typical industrial systems and simulate their dynamic response under stated conditions.

Practical and Professional Skills

This module allows you to carry out appropriate experiments in support of mass transfer, heat transfer, reaction engineering and process control. This involves carrying out supervised experiments and producing appropriate reports in an approved format. You make some formal presentations to outline efficient laboratory reporting, error analysis techniques and preparation of risk assessments.

Process Operations

In most production units, chemical engineers separate the desired product from the other compounds and concentrate it to give the desired product specification.
You gain a sound understanding of mass transfer theory. You learn about mass and energy conservation and particle technology and the basic concepts behind the design and operation of mass-transfer equipment.

Reactors and Bioreactors

The core of most chemical processes is a chemical reactor to produce the desired product. Sometimes the components of the reaction may be biologically active.
You gain a sound understanding of the fundamental concepts of reaction engineering in chemical and biochemical systems. You make use of the essential knowledge of mass and energy conservation, reaction equilibria and kinetics and are introduced to the basic concepts behind the design of different types of chemical and biochemical reactors.

 

Year 3 work placement

Final-year core modules

Advanced Process Operations

You broaden your knowledge and deepen your understanding of process unit operations and the underpinning science. It provides you with design methodologies for complex unit operations involving multicomponent distillation, liquid-liquid extraction, gas absorption, membrane processes and chromatography. You gain an in-depth understanding of the application of thermodynamics to mixtures.

Chemical Engineering in Industry

Chemical Engineering Project

Environment and Sustainable Processing

A group work project-approach addresses the impact of industrial and human activities on the environment and the need for a sustainable approach to future developments. You specifically consider sustainable remediation strategies for air, water and land pollution and alternative fuel and energy technologies towards zero carbon emission.

This module addresses key concepts and skills essential for an exploration of environment and sustainability. It also instils a broad and deep understanding of environmental problems. You are assessed by a group poster presentation (40%) and an academic paper (60%). Individual marks for this piece of group work are moderated according to evidence of your engagement with the process, including self and peer assessment.

Reactors and Catalysis

You develop your understanding of reaction engineering and apply your knowledge to complex and multi-phase reactions/reactors systems. You are also introduced to catalyst preparation and characterisation, and the use of catalysis in reaction engineering.

 

Modules offered may vary.

 

How you learn

You are expected to attend a range of lectures and problem-solving tutorials. You also use laboratory work widely to underpin the engineering principles studied. A series of laboratory-based activities provides a practical introduction to a range of engineering disciplines.

The course provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (such as lectures, tutorials, laboratory work, projects, examinations), but you are also expected to spend time on your own. This self-study time is to review lecture notes, prepare coursework assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 120 credits and each unit of credit corresponds to 10 hours of learning and assessment (contact hours plus self-study hours). So, during one year of full-time study you can expect to have 1,200 hours of learning and assessment.

One module in each year of your study, excluding your first year (Level 3), involves a compulsory one-week block delivery period. This intensive problem-solving week, provides you with an opportunity to focus your attention on particular problems and enhance your team-working and employability skills.

How you are assessed

Your course involves a range of assessments including coursework assignments, laboratory work, presentations and tests. You also work in teams on design project, and in the final year you complete a major individual project.


Our Disability Services team helps students with additional needs resulting from disabilities such as sensory impairment or learning difficulties such as dyslexia
Find out more about our disability services

Find out more about financial support
Find out more about our course related costs

 
 

Entry requirements

Entry requirements

Most UCAS tariff based offers are in the range of 32-88 tariff points. Non-tariff qualifications are also considered. The level of the tariff point offer depends on the subjects that you have studied.

You are expected to have at least Level 2 literacy and numeracy skills. GCSE grade 4 (or C) or a pass in Level 2 Functional Skills are acceptable.

If you are unsure your qualifications are eligible for admission, please contact our admissions office for advice.

Entry requirements are provided for guidance only. We offer entrance interviews which help us determine your eligibility for your chosen degree.

You are normally invited for interview before an offer is made. Your interview is to determine your potential to succeed and to help us set appropriate entry conditions matched to personal circumstances and the demands of the course. The interview also enables you to see our excellent facilities, meet staff and students, and to learn more about studying at Teesside University.

We encourage all applicants to attend an interview, but if you are unable to attend an interview we may consider your application based on your UCAS application alone. Online or skype interviews may be possible in some cases.

Non-EU international students who require a student visa to study in the UK must meet, in addition to the academic requirements, the UKVI compliant English language requirement. Please check our international student pages for further information.

For additional information please see the entry requirements in our admissions section

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country


You can gain considerable knowledge from work, volunteering and life. Under recognition of prior learning (RPL) you may be awarded credit for this which can be credited towards the course you want to study.
Find out more about RPL

 

Employability

Work placement year

Teesside University's School of Science, Engineering & Design produces graduates with the problem-solving and leadership skills necessary to forge successful careers.

This programme allows you to spend one year learning and developing your skills through work experience. You have a dedicated work placement officer and the University's award-winning careers service to assist you with applying for a placement. Advice is also available on job hunting and networking. Employers are often invited to our School to meet you and present you with opportunities for work placements.

By taking a work placement year you gain experience favoured by graduate recruiters and develop your technical skillset. You also obtain the transferable skills required in any professional environment. Transferable skills include communication, negotiation, teamwork, leadership, organisation, confidence, self-reliance, problem-solving, being able to work under pressure, and commercial awareness.

Throughout this programme, you get to know prospective employers and extend your professional network. An increasing number of employers view a placement as a year-long interview and as a result, placements are increasingly becoming an essential part of an organisation's pre-selection strategy in their graduate recruitment process.

Potential benefits from completing a work placement year include:

  • improved job prospects
  • enhanced employment skills and improved career progression opportunities
  • a higher starting salary
  • a better degree classification
  • a richer CV
  • a year's salary before completing your degree
  • experience of workplace culture
  • the opportunity to design and base your final-year project within a working environment.


We encourage and support you in your search and application for a work placement. If you are unable to secure a work placement with an employer, then you simply continue on a course without the work placement.

Career opportunities

Chemical engineers are employed worldwide in activities including research and development, design and plant operation. They are involved in a wide range of sectors, from the utilities, construction and defence, chemicals to oil and pharmaceuticals.



Working as a chemical engineer.

 

Information for international applicants

Qualifications

International applicants - find out what qualifications you need by selecting your country below.

Select your country:

  
 

Useful information

Visit our international pages for useful information for non-UK students and applicants.

Talk to us

Talk to an international student adviser

 
 

Full-time

Entry to 2019/20 academic year

Fee for UK/EU applicants
£9,250 a year

More details about our fees

Fee for international applicants
£11,825 a year

More details about our fees for international applicants


What is included in your tuition fee?

  • Length: 5 years (including a foundation year and work placement year)
  • UCAS code: H816 BEng/CInFY
  • Typical offer: Offers tailored to individual circumstances

Apply online (full-time) through UCAS

 

Part-time

  • Not available part-time
 

Choose Teesside

iPad

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Accommodation

Live in affordable accommodation right on-campus

 

Campus

Study in our town-centre campus with over £270m of recent investment

 

Industry ready

Benefit from work placements, live projects, accredited courses

 

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Facilities

A tour of Teesside University engineering facilities and employer partnerships, enabling us to produce graduates ready for the world of work.

 
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    Chemical engineering courses

    Find out more about our chemical engineering courses, specialist facilities and hear from our students and staff.

     
 
 

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