Undergraduate study
Engineering

Degree Apprenticeship Embedded Electronic Systems Design and Development Engineer

This Degree Apprenticeship is suitable for you if you are in employment and your employer is willing to support your professional development. Please seek guidance from your employer’s training manager if this is the right route for you. If it isn’t, another part-time route is available for BEng (Hons) Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Course information

Full-time

  • Not available full-time

Part-time

  • 4 years via direct entry to year 2 (240 credits)

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    Reporting on engineering at Teesside University

    A tour of Teesside University engineering facilities and employer partnerships, enabling us to produce graduates ready for the world of work.

 

The role of the embedded electronic systems design and development engineer is to apply their knowledge of electronics and of embedded software to the design of circuits or devices that provide a useful function, that are capable of being manufactured at a competitive cost, and that are reliable and safe in use. This involves the use of the engineer’s knowledge of electronics and electronic principles, married to an expertise in the end use of the final product.

Examples of industrial sectors that rely heavily on embedded systems design and development engineers include aerospace, automotive, automation and instrumentation, robotics, telecommunications, information and computer technology, defence, energy (including renewables), transport and consumer electronics. The role provides the basis of learning with potential to specialise as a hardware engineer, software engineer or systems engineer in these sectors and can extend from design of integrated circuits through to complete systems.

Embedded electronic systems design and development engineers will spend their careers in these industries developing the next generations of products such as smartphones, electric vehicles, communications satellites, smart grids and bringing concepts such as smart cities into reality. For others, an initial grounding in design and development will prove an excellent launch pad for a career in applications engineering, product management, marketing or general management. The embedded electronic systems design and development engineer must be proficient in a wide range of skills, underpinned by academic understanding, to enable them to work across these sub-sectors and specialisms. Apprentices will complete a degree that will support the fundamental scientific and mathematical principles that equip them with the understanding required to operate effectively and efficiently at a high level within any of these sectors. This will be supported by vocational training to develop the required competencies specific to particular roles within the chosen sectors.

Modules

Year 1 core modules

Calculus

Introducing the skills you need to study engineering at degree level, this module covers differential and integral calculus.

You develop your mathematical skills and learn techniques of fundamental operations such as differentiation and integration to solve differential equations.

You also improve your ability to select and apply appropriate calculus techniques to solve engineering problems.

Digital Electronics and Programmable Logic Controllers

You gain an introduction to basic digital logic operations and simple digital logic circuits. The module then examines microprocessor fundamentals and the programming of microprocessors in assembly language. Weekly lectures explain theory, discuss applications and develop your learning through the solution of simplified illustrative examples. Fortnightly, practical sessions reinforce the lecture material in digital electronics and provide an opportunity for you to program a microprocessor system using assembly language. You are assessed through a combination of in-course assignments and an end examination

Electrical and Electronic Principles

This module gives you a basic understanding of the physical fundamentals used in electrical engineering, together with specific techniques you need to determine the behaviour of electric circuits.

We cover the fundamentals of electrical circuit theory, analysis of electrical circuits, give you an understanding of simple analogue and digital circuits and an appreciation of their application to engineering problems.

We look at voltage, current, power, energy, resistance and impedance. Also magnetic fields and inductance, electric fields and capacitance, Kirchhoff’s Laws. We examine time varying voltages and currents, effects on inductors and capacitors, sinusoidal voltage and current use of symbolic notation.

You also study power, reactive power and apparent power, circuit analysis techniques, mesh and nodal analysis, transistors and properties of amplifiers.

Our primary method of teaching is lectures supported by laboratory sessions, tutorials, problem solving and directed learning.

You learn how to:

  • understand and use key elements of electrical and electronic theory
  • apply given tools in the solution of well defined electrical and electronic engineering problems
  • apply numerical skills to simple electrical and electronic engineering problems
  • use basic IT tools and specialist software to solve simple electrical and electronic engineering problems.

Engineering Design and CAD

This module introduces you to the basic principles and practice of engineering design and the use of Computer Aided Design systems. You gain an understanding of the methods of graphical communication, competing requirements, and how to organise design data. CAD is used to produce simple, orthographic, and schematic representations of engineered components.

Engineering Mathematics

This module introduces the range of mathematical skills that are relevant to an engineering degree. You revisit and develop your knowledge of the fundamentals of algebra, trigonometry and basic statistics. The central ideas of vectors, matrices, complex numbers, and differential and integral calculus are also examined.

Throughout the module you develop a range of mathematical skills and techniques fundamental to the solution of engineering problems. You also advance your skills in selecting and applying mathematical techniques.

This module is delivered through a combination of lectures and tutorial sessions.

Group Design Project

This is a group project module which is part of the group project theme running through all the en-gineering programmes. You are exposed to the practice of creating an engineered design and to the organisational issues of controlling and participating in a group project.

It will provide the opportunity to work in a team in order to solve a well defined problem. In the process, you will gain understanding of your own and other people’s knowledge and limitations, along with an appreciation of group dynamics and the process and importance of working with other members of a team.

An entire week is taken out from the standard teaching timetable and allocated to this module which allows the real time application of skills and knowledge developed in the preceding weeks to be applied to enable manufacture of the designed product.

Each group of students will be expected to produce a tangible output from the design and manufacturing work which will account for 60% of the module. For the remaining 40% of marks, you will be assessed on the group work process.

Physics and Instrumentation

This module provides you with an introduction to instrumentation, through studying the principles and characteristics of measurement systems and elements, and their underlying physical principles.

On successful completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • gather record, describe and evaluate sensor and system data from a variety of sources
  • demonstrate practical ability in carrying out experimental physical measurements, within defined contexts in areas relevant to physics and instrumentation
  • present written evidence to demonstrate understanding of experimental investigation of underlying physical principles of measurement sensors and systems.

You will be assessed on an exam, system design exercise and laboratory report.

Professional Skills

Knowledge of your degree subject is not the only thing you will learn at university, nor is it the only thing which potential employers will be looking for after graduation. You also need to develop a range of skills that are applicable in all walks of life. These include:
- the ability to communicate clearly and effectively to different audiences, both orally and in writing
- the ability to make an effective contribution as a member of a team, and also to work independently or on your own initiative when required
- the ability to tackle problems for which all the necessary knowledge is not available
- the ability to locate information and assess its usefulness
- the ability to make efficient and effective use of the latest information technology.

You also learn to assess their own performance - recognising and building on your strengths, identifying and improving your weaknesses.

This module is the first in a series running through each degree programme in which these key skills are explicitly developed and assessed, by means of a series of learning activities that require the use of different skills, while also teaching key aspects of the chosen subject. The module is delivered via a combination of seminars, laboratory classes and some lectures; the exact pattern will be different for different degree programmes. Assessment is via reflective statements, which require students to identify knowledge and skills that have been developed during the module

Properties of Materials

This module provides you with a foundational knowledge of important properties of engineering materials, together with a hands-on appreciation of these through laboratory-based practical sessions.

Fundamental relationships between processing, structure, properties and performance will be explored to highlight factors that influence the suitability of materials for various engineering applications.

 

Year 2 core modules

Analogue and Digital Communications Principles

This module introduces communications principles and communications systems, including signal analysis and noise.

You develop an understanding of communications principles and transmission systems. From studying a range of elementary methods such as analogue communications, transmission media and signal analysis, you gain a technical overview and an appreciation of the capabilities and limitations of communications principles.

Digital Electronics Design and Implementation

In this group project module you work in teams to solve an industrially relevant digital electronics design problem. Through your project work you develop employability skills such as project management, work presentation, research and commercial awareness. You become more adept at technical problem solving.

You investigate digital electronics and are introduced to digital electronics design techniques, and their application to real problems.

Electrical Engineering

This module introduces electrical power systems, including balanced/unbalanced three-phase systems, transformers, and transmission lines.
Practical sessions involve the use of laboratory setups and software packages (Pspice & Matlab) for the analysis of power system component characteristics. Tutorials will involve guided exercises and practical tasks incorporating examples of current industry practice.

Electrical Machines

You study electrical machines and cover all the major machines: DC, induction, and synchronous, as well as some special machines including stepper and variable reluctance motors.

You also perform in-depth investigations into machine performance and operation characteristics, in both analytical and experimental methods, using laboratory setups and software packages (Pspice & Matlab) for the analysis of DC and AC machine performance during practical sessions.

Electronics and Networks

In this module we use a computer-based teaching approach to provide a thorough understanding of network theory, integrated-circuit operational amplifiers and feedback.

You review and extend the network theory underpinning this module and discover the characteristics and limitations of operational amplifiers (op-amps). We also examine the effects of various feedback configurations on op-amp performance and investigate a wide range of op-amp applications and design circuits to given specifications.

We look at basic amplifier concepts, basic op-amp configurations, feedback principles and op-amp imperfections.

Lectures are the main vehicle for presenting fundamentals and doing worked examples. We provide a detailed set of course notes.

Tutorial sessions (laboratory based) cover the analysis and design of circuits associated with particular applications using LTSPICE (electronic circuit simulation software).

Practical work is used to develop traditional practical skills but is enhanced by computer simulations. You work in groups of not more than three.

You learn how to:

  • demonstrate a detailed knowledge of aspects of electronics and networks
  • critically analyse a variety of ideas, contexts and frameworks associated with electronics and networks
  • apply, question and relate appropriate knowledge and concepts to a range of activities
  • identify key areas of problems and choose appropriate tools or methods for their resolution in a considered manner
  • interpret and use the information from manufacturers’ data sheets
  • apply practical testing methods to electronic circuits to establish system performance.

Embedded Systems

This teamwork module gives you the chance to solve an industrially relevant problem.

It develops your knowledge of embedded systems and the programming and application of these systems in real time.

Employment Skills for Engineers

You develop your self-marketing, confidence and professional skills that are typically demanded by potential graduate employers.

You are introduced to a number of role-play selection exercises often used by graduate employers; these can include preparing covering letters and CVs, online application forms, attending mock interviews, completing psychometric tests, delivering presentations and contributing to assessment centre tasks.

You develop the necessary skills to succeed at the above exercises using a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) format to emphasise the importance of skills development and career management. This module is also supported by the University’s Careers Service at key stages throughout the lecture plan.

Laplace Transforms

Learn advanced techniques relevant to the solution of discipline-specific engineering problems.

Module content includes the solution of second order differential equations and Laplace transforms.

You learn through lectures and worked examples which illustrate how mathematical techniques are applied.

Problem-solving tutorial exercises give you the opportunity to practise new skills and techniques.

Linear Systems and Control

You will develop a thorough understanding of time-domain and frequency-domain representations of signals and systems, and how to apply these ideas to engineering problems.

You will develop the necessary knowledge and techniques to create dynamic models of engineering systems.

We give you the knowledge and techniques for creating dynamic models of engineering systems and to apply computer-aided methods of analysis and design, plus use data acquisition systems for laboratory investigations.

We examine modelling and simulation, linear time-invariant systems, first and second-order systems, frequency response, poles and zeros, basic concepts of control, alternative control methods, fourier analysis and filters.

In lectures we explaina principles and discuss applications then give you a guided solution of relevant examples in tutorials.

In the laboratories you work in groups of up to three on a small engineering plant. You are expected to produce a model and carry out tests to establish parameters. This process enhances the theoretical work carried out in other parts of the module.

You learn how to:

  • demonstrate a detailed knowledge of aspects of linear systems and control
  • critically analyse a variety of ideas, contexts and frameworks associated with linear systems and control
  • apply, question and relate appropriate knowledge and concepts to a range of activities
  • identify key areas of problems and choose appropriate tools and methods for their resolution in a considered manner
  • use the industry-standard software MATLAB SIMULINK for simulation and design of signal processing and control systems
  • apply mathematical techniques to analyse and model signal processing and control systems.

Mathematics for Electrical and Instrumentation Engineers

This module introduces further techniques that are relevant to the solution of discipline-specific engineering problems. The content includes the Solution of Second Order Differential Equations, Laplace Transforms, Fourier Series and Transforms, and Matrix algebra.

 

Final-year core modules

Digital Communications

This module provides you with an introduction to the basic principles of the design and analysis of modern digital communication systems. Topics include digital modulations, source coding, channel coding, baseband and pass band modulation techniques, receiver design, channel equalization, digital telephone modems, compact discs, and digital wireless communication systems. Concepts are illustrated by a sequence of MATLAB exercises.

Electric Drive Systems l

Develop your capability to analyse and design power electronic converters and integrate them into direct current electric drive systems.

Lectures offer explanations of principles and discussion of applications. Tutorials provide guided exercises. You also take part in a series of practical classes designed to reinforce the theory you have learnt. These sessions demonstrate the dependence of drive system performance on the characteristics of power converters and control schemes.

Electric Drive Systems ll

Develop your capability to analyse and design power electronic converters and integrate them into alternating current electric drive systems.

Lectures offer explanations of principles and discussion of applications. Tutorials provide guided exercises. You also take part in a series of practical classes designed to reinforce the theory you have learnt. These sessions demonstrate the dependence of drive system performance on the characteristics of power converters and control schemes.

Electrical Engineering Design and Implementation

You work in a team to solve a complex control system design and implementation problem. This module amplifies your understanding of the limits of knowledge and the importance of bringing in and working with people with a different knowledge base and skillset.

Working in a team enables you to successfully resolve problems that can’t be resolved as an individual. You develop a consolidated set of employability skills in project management, presentation of work, research and commercial awareness, to support complex problem-solving in a technical context and enhance the awareness of professional issues such as health, safety, environment and ethics in the workplace.

A problem-based learning approach is adopted and, where appropriate, supporting lectures and seminars include technical knowledge or skills development. You are assessed through two in-course assessments.

Electronics

To extend the depth of your understanding of analogue electronics, especially in the context of integrated circuits, this module covers the interaction of circuit segments (loading), temperature dependence and device variability, and how to robustly design around these problems.

You use the ‘library’ of common configurations to build larger circuits and to see how integration and component matching facilitates complex general and application-specific circuits, with examples drawn from the variety of analogue devices currently available.

Laboratories enable you to perform analysis, simulation and synthesis of relevant circuit configurations, both using components on Breadboard and by simulation in SPICE.

Management Skills for Engineers

You develop advanced interpersonal skills that enable you to integrate into the workplace. You develop key employability skills that support the engineering design and management process. Issues such as ethics, conflict in a team, equality and diversity, presenting to challenging non-technical audiences such as members of the public or the media and corporate responsibility are considered from a senior management perspective.

Power Systems

This module presents methods of power system analysis to give you a sound understanding of a broad range of topics related to power system engineering.

You study operation and design, and the economics of high voltage generation and transformation systems.

Frequency and voltage control, and transient schemes are covered for both normal and fault conditions.

Lectures offer explanations of principles and discussion of applications. Tutorials provide guided exercises. You take part in a series of practical classes designed to reinforce the theory you have learnt. You also take part in a series of practical sessions, utilising a range of electrical power systems, laboratory equipment and industry standard software to analyse power systems.

Power Transmission and Distribution

This module presents methods of design and analysis related to electrical power transmission and distribution.

You study the function and selection of high voltage transmission media and the arrangement of delivering electrical power to consumers.

The impact of fault conditions on the network, both balanced and unbalanced, are also considered as is the means of providing protection if faults arise.

Project

This module extends the development of independent learning skills by allowing you to investigate an area of engineering or technology for an extended period.

You receive training in writing technical reports for knowledgeable readers and you produce a report or dissertation of the work covered. In addition, you give an oral presentation, a poster presentation or both. The topic can be in the form of a research project or a design project.

You develop key skills in research, knowledge application and creation through keynote lectures where appropriate and self-managed independent study. Support is provided through regular tutorial sessions.

 

Non-credit bearing optional modules

In-sessional Academic English (for International Students)

 

Modules offered may vary.

How you learn

The course is studied part-time as you must be in full-time employment (paid or unpaid) throughout the duration of the course.

Its been developed to recognise the work place as a centre of knowledge building, and the course supports you by combining learning opportunities within the workplace and the learning environment of the University. This approach allows you to meet the higher learning and skills required for your own success and those of employers, now and in the future.

How you are assessed

You are assessed as part of the BEng (Hons) Electrical and Electronic Engineering degree at Teesside University, and this forms the assessment of the academic side of your degree apprenticeship. Your employer will also assess your vocational competency on an ongoing basis, and there is an overall Degree Apprenticeship end assessment you will need to pass.

The Degree Apprenticeship will be awarded on successful completion of all assessment elements.

How to apply

To apply for this Degree Apprenticeship you must have the full agreement and support of your employer. To receive a link to the online application form please email your request to sse-admissions@tees.ac.uk.

For direct entry to year 2 candidates are required to be qualified to at least a HNC in electrical and electronic engineering (or equivalent).

If you and your employer are interested in you joining this degree apprenticeship from year 1 then we will arrange for you to do an appropriate HNC. For entry to the HNC, you will need A level standard or equivalent in maths and at least one further STEM based subject such as physics, ICT, computing or electronics, plus English language at GCSE (grade C or above).

For additional information please see the entry requirements in our admissions section

Course information

Full-time

  • Not available full-time

Part-time

  • 4 years via direct entry to year 2 (240 credits)

Contact details

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