Undergraduate study
Law, Policing & Investigation

LLB (Hons) Law with Policing*

UCAS code: M1L4 LLB/LwP
UCAS code: M1L0 LLB/LwPFY for Year 0 entry

This new qualifying law degree offers all the compulsory law modules of an LLB (Hons) plus a strong introduction to core principles of police practice and policy.

Course information

Full-time

  • Length: 3 years or 4 years including foundation year

More full-time details

Part-time

  • Minimum of 4 years

More part-time details

  • Daytime or evening
  • Enrolment date: September
  • Admission enquiries: 01642 342308

Contact details

Further information

  • Facilities

    Teesside Law Clinic

    Teesside University is committed to ensuring our students graduate with the best possible skills for employment in the legal profession. Through Teesside Law Clinic we work in partnership with lawyers, charities and voluntary organisations to provide our students with real opportunities and practical skills in law.

 

You study law and policing modules (67% law and 33% policing) in each year of the programme allowing for development of expertise in both areas of study, culminating in a dissertation providing an opportunity to combine both disciplines.

The LLB (Hons) Law and Policing is split across three years, each consisting of two semesters. You study three modules in each semester, totalling six modules per academic year.

To get Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) status, you must successfully complete the foundations of legal knowledge; these seven subjects are Contract Law, Public Law, Tort, Land Law, Criminal Law, Equity and Trusts, and European Union Law. In addition to this you study carefully selected modules from the policing stream which, together, provide an introduction to the principles and concepts underpinning the study of policing and the investigative process

Please note that module titles may be subject to change.

Course structure

Year 0 (foundation year) core modules

Fake News?

Portfolio 1

Portfolio 2

Succeeding in Higher Education & beyond

Succeeding in Higher Education. How to be your best

Teesside and the Region (Tantalising Teesside)

 

Year 1 core modules

Information Security and Cybercrime

You cover a range of issues relating to information and computer security, including systematic approaches to managing security risks, elementary cryptography, how computers are used in the execution of crime, and how such crimes are investigated.

Legal Foundations

Policing, Criminal Justice and Society

This module provides you with foundation knowledge to study the criminological foundations that underpin the Criminal Justice System. It examines some of the processes, procedures, power and politics that shape and influence the way that institutions operate within the Criminal Justice System.

Particular emphasis is placed on the various theoretical and sociological approaches that assume that the Criminal Justice System is the product of many cultural, social and mental processes.

You are also introduced to a range of study skills and transferable skills relevant to your degree and future career.

The Citizen and the State – Civil Liberties and Human Rights

The Citizen and the State - The Constitution

The Law of Contract

Contract law is one of the most fundamental aspects of law. All contracts are agreements but not all agreements are contracts. This module explores the differences between informal agreements and those enforceable in law. It also covers issues that can arise within a contract including when someone is misled, when a party changes its mind about a contract, when one party does not perform a contract in whole or in part, and when property delivered as part of a contract is defective. In all of these cases you study the established principles for allocating responsibility.

At the end of the module you can look at a problem scenario, identify the legal contractual issues involved and propose a solution or offer advice to the parties involved. This module is very relevant to the business environment.

 

Year 2 core modules

Contemporary Issues and Legal Research

Criminal Law

As perhaps the best known aspect of the legal system, criminal law presents an interesting and challenging area of study.

You are introduced to the English legal system and gain an understanding of the nature and purpose of criminal law, the principles of criminalisation and the basic elements of a crime. You examine some controversial aspects of criminal law, including, for example, particularly problematic criminal offences and defences and the way the criminal law responds to social problems.

Exploring Investigation

This module introduces you to issues relating to contemporary investigation practices. Building on knowledge gained in level 4 modules, it will expand your existing knowledge of criminal investigations, broadening the focus to include state and political crime, and issues relating to the recording of crime and the sentencing of offenders. Assessment focuses around researching a topic, presenting it, and reflecting upon that process.

Investigation in Context

This module will develop your existing knowledge in relation to crime and its investigation, drawing on existing cases to offer an updated context, focusing on current investigative practices, preparing you for your final year of study.

The Law of Equity and Trusts

You consider how equity has developed alongside the common law to provide justice in cases where the law provides no remedy or where the remedy is inadequate. You come to understand that the common law only provides the remedy of damages whereas equity provides additional remedies. These can include specific performance and injunctions - both are often the desired outcome of civil action.

You explore the legal ownership of property and its historys. You are introduced to the law’s most important contemporary uses in relation to family provision, pension funds and the operation of charities.

The Law of Tort

You encounter a range of civil actions associated with tort and are introduced to tort as a compensation system. Module content draws on the issues of claiming compensation after an accident. Unlike criminal law, which determines guilt, you come to understand the way that tort seeks to apportion liability and award damages to compensate the injured party.

The most prominent area of tortious liability is negligence. You examine the elements required to establish liability in detail. The importance of understanding the components of negligence and how to minimise the risk of liability is relevant to all businesses. Other forms of tortious liability include trespass (to land and to the person), defamation and nuisance - you consider a range of these torts.

We emphasise developing your critical awareness of the issues underpinning the legal process of tort and enhancing your analytical abilities and written presentation skills. You consider how our society has adopted a litigation culture and the potential drivers.

 

Final-year core modules

Defendants and Witnesses in the Criminal Justice System

This module focuses on the law concerned with the obtaining and admissibility of evidence at trial. It challenges you to explore the relevance of evidence in the investigatory process and during the criminal trial. Whilst the module is suited for those who wish to continue their studies and join various legal or investigative professions, it is an academic module and examines the law of evidence from an academic viewpoint.

Dissertation

This module begins with formal lectures and seminars covering topics like how to conduct a dissertation and the research process – timetabling, supervision, structure and guidelines will be covered. You will be provided with a supervisor to support and guide you through the dissertation process. Personal development is embedded within the process as you are expected to complete a reflective diary.

Every Contact Leaves a Trace

Every contact leaves a trace is a phrase used to sum up Locard's Exchange Principle, which is the foundation of forensic science.

This module develops your knowledge, skills and understanding of the use of scientific evidence within the criminal justice system, and requires you to learn how to locate, record and recover forensic evidence. It also develops your knowledge, skills and understanding of the uses of forensic, fingerprint and witness evidence in the investigation of crime.

As a result the module also explores potential investigative career opportunities for graduates.

 

and one optional module

Criminal Law Theory

This module promotes a critical understanding of some of the theories that underpin our criminal law. From general legal philosophies to their particular effects on specific areas of criminal law, you explore the theories of culpability and blameworthiness in the context of specific academic debates.

You question which types of conduct should be criminalised, how the criminal law should treat mentally disordered offenders, when we should exempt individuals from criminal liability, whether the test for recklessness is subjective or objective, and whether there a place for negligence in criminal law.

Family Law

Explore cohabitation, marriage, separation and divorce and consider the various legal aspects of these relationships. Examine how the law regulates the interaction of parties within a relationship, defining their rights and responsibilities, minimally during the course of the relationship, but in detail should it end.

The module also concentrates on children in family law. Traditionally the law focused on parents but modern developments, particularly those resulting in the Children Act 1989, have focused more on the rights of the child and the responsibilities of parents and others taking the place of parents.

You examine how private law (which regulates the relationship of the child to others) and public law (which focuses on child protection) are brought together.

International Law

This module examines the principles and structures underpinning international law. You explore the sources and modes of development of international law and look into key international institutions and the operation and enforcement of international law in specific areas. The topic is considered in the context of current international issues.

By studying the nature of international law you become able to critically analyse the extent to which international law performs its function. The content of this module may vary to take account of current issues.

Land Law

Law relating to the transfer of land affects us all. No piece of land is the same as another and the law has developed in the last 900 years to reflect this. Historically, land law was about large interests and traditional estates. This changed during the 20th century as more people aspired to be owner-occupiers and the individual home owner replaced the landlord as the dominant figure. In the latter part of the 20th century the owner-occupier couple replaced the single, predominately male owner.

Today, the process of compulsory land registration is completing the transformation of this subject. The focus of this module is co-owned, registered land as land law is taught in its modern, social context.

Medical Law

This module covers medical and mental health law in a broad context. You study the medical professions, and liability in medical law with a focus on medical negligence. You also cover birth and death, assisted reproduction and other topical debates. Spanning across the subject is the issue of consent – its scope and its implication for those with disability.

You explore compulsory detention in hospital, and treatment for those with a mental disorder and the law in relation to their discharge. You also examine how the law affects those without capacity.

The Law of the European Union

You study European Union (EU) with particular emphasis on the institutions involved in making and interpreting law. You explore how EU law works and how it impacts on the UK’s legal system.

You consider the free movement provisions of the EU, particularly of people and goods. You also consider some of the EU’s policies which have a significant impact on its 500 million people. Knowledge of EU law and the law making process is vital for businesses operating in and with the EU.

 

Modules offered may vary.

How you learn

Under the guidance of experienced staff your learning involves a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and guided reading. In lectures, specific information is delivered to larger groups while in the smaller seminar groups issues can be explored in more depth. Workshops are informal sessions in which you can extend your knowledge or seek further clarification of issues.

You have the opportunity to complete practical sessions within the crime scene house, vehicle examination laboratory, mock police station, interview rooms and the mock courtroom. In addition to scheduled teaching sessions, staff are readily available to provide further academic support and guidance. A host of distinguished guests deliver lectures which enhance your learning experience.

Completion of the seven foundation subjects gives Qualifying Law Degree status, granting exemption from the academic stage of training as a solicitor or barrister.

How you are assessed

Assessment is varied and includes essays, problem-solving questions, examinations, presentations, mooting, poster presentation and a dissertation. You also undertake formative assessment which does not count towards your overall mark but provides you with feedback so you can realise your full potential in those assessments that do count.

Timetabling information
As a full-time student your timetabled hours are between Monday to Friday, 9.00am - 6.00pm. On Wednesdays the latest you will be timetabled is until 1.00pm. Hours of attendance vary between 12 hours and 20 hours per week. Part-time undergraduate students are required to attend during the same days and times as full-time students but for only a proportion of the time, dependant on the modules being taken. Module choices are discussed with course tutors during the enrolment and induction period. Further details are automatically sent to applicants due to enrol this year.

Your full teaching timetable for Semester 1 of the 2018/19 academic year should be available from 1 September 2018. Standard University term dates can be found here.


Our Disability Services team helps students with additional needs resulting from disabilities such as sensory impairment or learning difficulties such as dyslexia
Find out more about our disability services

Find out more about financial support
Find out more about our course related costs

Career opportunities

This degree provides the knowledge and skills to pursue a wide range of careers in both the legal professions and the police service. The transferable skills you develop on this cross-disciplinary programme can be used in a wide range of other professions including within the broader criminal justice sector.

Entry requirements

A typical offer is 88-112 tariff points from at least two A levels (or equivalent). You must also have GCSEs in English at grade 4 (grade C) or equivalent. We recommend an Access course if you're a mature student.

For entry to Year 0 (Foundation Year) a typical offer is 32-64 tariff points from at least two A levels (or equivalent) and GCSE grade 4 (grade C) or equivalent in English.

For additional information please see the entry requirements in our admissions section

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country


You can gain considerable knowledge from work, volunteering and life. Under recognition of prior learning (RPL) you may be awarded credit for this which can be credited towards the course you want to study.
Find out more about RPL

* Subject to University approval

Foundation year

Part-time

What is Unistats?

How to understand the Unistats data

Course information

Full-time

  • Length: 3 years or 4 years including foundation year

More full-time details

Part-time

  • Minimum of 4 years

More part-time details

  • Daytime or evening
  • Enrolment date: September
  • Admission enquiries: 01642 342308

Contact details

Further information