Undergraduate study
Food and Nutrition (with Foundation Year)

Food and Nutrition (with Foundation Year)
BSc (Hons)

 
 

Course overview

This extended degree course is ideal if you wish to study for a university degree but you don’t have the necessary Level 3 qualifications required for direct admission. In the first year of the extended programme, you enhance your knowledge in maths and the fundamentals of biological, chemical and physical sciences.

You can complete an optional work placement year as part of this degree course at no extra cost.

This BSc (Hons) Food and Nutrition course develops your understanding of the complex interactions between food composition, metabolism, diet, health and behaviour - all vital in the drive to reduce the incidence of long-term conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer. How we go from basic science to changing behaviour is key to the development of nutritional strategies.

This course reflects the range of skills and knowledge required by professionals in the very diverse food and nutrition sector. You are equipped for further study, or for a wide variety of career opportunities, including teaching, nutrition, food science, food safety, environmental health and new product development. Our consistent exceptional employability performance reflects the high level of knowledge and skills our graduates acquire from our food degree programmes, and the value employers place on these. Our food degrees are also highly regarded overseas. We train academic staff from overseas partner universities delivering food degrees, and you will be studying alongside other UK, European and overseas students who have come to Teesside University to study for their food degree.

Professional accreditation

Students enrolled on this course are eligible to apply for membership to the Institute of Food Science & Technology.

 

Course details

In Year 1 you study the essential skills needed to be a scientist in an applied science context, including practical methodologies, techniques and analytical tools to enable you to draw conclusions and present them appropriately. You also learn about health and safety, scientific ethics and entrepreneurship.

You do a series of relevant practical investigative projects in Year 2 to enhance your practical knowledge and skills.

In the final year you develop your independent learning skills by investigating an area of food and nutrition for an extended period. You develop key skills in research and applying and creating knowledge.

Course structure

Year 0 (foundation year) core modules

Big Data

Big data – it’s a phrase that a lot of people would argue is overused, or at least not always used in the appropriate context. So what is it really? How is it made and how do we make sense of it?

In this module you learn how big data is not just abundant but a growing field in so many aspects of our society from policing and conservation to health and bioinformatics. You explore how groups and communities use and share big data to help keep themselves safe in disaster zones around the world. You begin to value the role data plays in helping to make sense of community relationships in society, from uncovering criminal networks, tracking disease outbreaks to developing a deeper understanding of our ecology.

Data might end up in a data-frame spreadsheet format but it doesn’t begin there. It is often created with people and animals engaging with each other and technology. You explore how search engines collate and store the data we need to help make predictions, enhance decision making, or simply to better understand society’s needs.

Chemical Science and the Environment

This module provides an overview of fundamental concepts in chemistry and their application in the context of environmental and life sciences

Chemistry is the study of the structure, properties and reactivity of elements and compounds, and plays a key role in all physical, life and applied sciences. The topics covered include the structure of the atom, the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactivity, environmental science, biogeochemistry, pollution, green chemistry and climate change.

Experimental Methods for Life Science

This module is based around a series of laboratory sessions. The first sessions emphasise important foundation skills, such as how to work safely in a practical environment and how to properly document practical work. These are followed by a series of sessions based on your wider academic interests including the basics of microscopy, handling microorganisms, safe handling food, using volumetric glassware and investigating acid base titrations.

Global Grand Challenges

This module focuses on how science can help address some of the biggest global Grand Challenges that face society. This reflects the University’s focus on externally facing research that makes a real, practical difference to the lives of people and the success of businesses and economies.

You work on a project in a group, to enabling you to develop innovative answers to some of the biggest issues of our time based on five thematic areas – health and wellbeing, resilient and secure societies, digital and creative economy, sustainable environments and learning for the 21st century.

Life on Earth

This module explores the diversity of life on earth and the concept of evolution. You consider Darwin’s theory of evolution through natural selection to demonstrate relationships between species, the principles of taxonomy and speciation, and how they relate to the evolutionary tree.

You are introduced to the physiological processes, cellular organisation, homeostasis, metabolism, growth, reproduction, response to stimuli and adaptation - all hallmarks of living organisms equipping diverse species to survive and thrive.

Life Science

This module focuses on the life sciences from a human perspective. While developing an understanding of human biology you explore the role of different but interconnected life science disciplines in modern life.

While reviewing life science from an interdisciplinary context, relatable to a variety of backgrounds, you examine the major human body systems – cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, nervous, digestive, skeletal and reproductive. This module enables you to appreciate how such knowledge is relevant to issues in health, disease and modern society.

 

Year 1 core modules

Biochemistry and Chemical Science

Biochemistry, the study of the chemistry of life, is one of the most important and exciting areas of science. It spans areas including biomedical science, nutrition, drug design, forensic science, agriculture and manufacturing. It covers the most important principles of biochemistry including the structure of the atom, chemical bonding and the forces that operate between molecules, chemical reactions and biological pathways. You study the chemistry of carbon and why it is capable of forming the complex 3D modules that make life possible. And you study important groups of biological molecules in detail including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids.

Cell Biology and Microbiology

The cellular basis of all living organisms is one of the characteristics which defines life. This module explores the common features and the immense diversity of form and function displayed by cells of organisms. The module will increase your understanding of biological processes at the cellular level. It covers the structure and function of major cellular components and examines how fundamental processes within cells are organised and regulated, such as gene and protein expression. It also addresses the mechanisms by which cells divide, reproduce and differentiate. You study the historical development of cell biology and microbiology advances in theoretical and practical aspects of the discipline. You explore how knowledge of the biology of microorganisms, including bacteria and viruses, has informed the identification and control of infectious diseases. You also examine the beneficial roles of many microorganisms and their utilisation in genetic engineering and biotechnology.

Core Skills in Food Science

Knowledge of the degree subject is not the only thing you learn whilst at university and it’s not the only thing that potential employers are looking for after graduation. You also need to develop a range of skills applicable for a variety of career pathways These include your ability to articulate yourself clearly, confidently and effectively to different audiences; to work independently or on your own initiative demonstrating creativity and adaptability when tackling problems where you don’t have all the necessary information available; to locate information and critically assess its usefulness; and to make efficient and effective use of the latest information technology.

You also learn to assess your own performance, giving you the chance to recognise and build on your strengths, and identify and improve your weaknesses as a way to raise your aspirations. This module also introduces you to basic principles and good practice in collecting, recording and evaluating data, and using information resources and referencing. You also consider the assessment and handling of scientific errors. You review a range of basic mathematical skills and introduce statistical methods that are essential in a wide range of scientific endeavour. Emphasis is placed on using spreadsheets for data recording, presentation and statistical analysis.

Food and Health Investigations

You consider the legal principles of health, safety, environment and ethics facing the professional in the workplace, and have the opportunity to work in teams in order to solve a routine, employer-relevant problem. Your technical and practical knowledge is supplemented by learning employability skills such as time management, presentation of work, and research to support problem solving in a technical context

Food Chain and Sustainability

You examine the major food commodities from technical, agricultural, sustainability and food industry perspectives. Through this module you explore the food supply chain including the structure and organisation of various food production including meat, fish, cereal, fruit, vegetable, dairy and brewery.

Food Science and Nutrition

This module provides you with an introduction to the fundamental concepts that underpin modern food science and nutrition. This includes a review of the composition of food, in terms of macronutrients and micronutrients. You also look at energy in food and the consequences of malnutrition, addressing the question of how to translate our understanding of food and nutrition science into public health initiatives that actually change people’s behaviour for the better.

This translational science agenda provides the rationale for the course and introduces you to the issues surrounding food, nutrition and translational science

 

Year 2 core modules

Food Safety and Law

During this module, you investigate a range of current food safety and regulatory issues. A broad range of factors affect food safety, including food-borne pathogens, chemical safety and foreign object contamination, and you study all of these, together with the implementation of food safety management systems including HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points).

You acquire a comprehensive understanding of the law relating to food safety, the compositional requirements, labeling, and advertising of food for human consumption. The module content will be delivered via a series of lecturers and tutorials that allow you to develop a critical understanding of the complex nature of key food law and food safety issues. You develop your sampling skills and techniques through practical sessions

Food Science and Chemistry

This module examines the chemistry and composition of foods and introduces you to, and gives you practical experience in a wide range of chemical and other analysis techniques commonly applied to raw materials and food products.

Human Diseases and Immunology

Infectious diseases are responsible for a third of global mortality and have a significant impact on quality of life on a worldwide basis. This module examines the organisms able to generate pathogenic interactions with human populations and takes a systems-based approach, for example gastrointestinal, respiratory and genitourinary tract, to examine the virulence determinants, pathology, characteristics and epidemiology of selected pathogens. You are also introduced to the current molecular and cellular biology of pathogen interactions and co-evolution with host cells, and their relevance to human diseases. And you consider the factors contributing to the emergence of devastating pandemics and new diseases, in particular the significance of zoonotic diseases. The module reviews the extensive array of protein and cell-based responses which are typically launched against microbial pathogens as part of the innate and acquired immune response. You analyse the effectiveness of strategies used to treat and control the transmission of infectious diseases.

Human Metabolism and Clinical Biochemistry

This module provides you with a broad understanding of the linked themes of metabolism and endocrinology. Metabolism, the chemical processes that occur in living organisms, is examined in the context of cellular respiration, and the metabolism of exogens such as drugs and vitamins. Endocrinology, the study of the physiological role of hormones, is covered in detail, including review of the mechanisms underpinning hormone action, the roles of second messengers, and endocrine system disorders. This module also explores the methods used for collecting, measuring and analysing clinical samples.

Public Health and Health Promotion

This module provides you with the opportunity to work in a team to solve an open-ended problem that is relevant to a public health employer. You examine the key methods used in gathering and analysing public health data, and analyse factors that influence the health of individuals and communities.

You explore a variety of strategies and methodologies to protect and improve public health, and consider practical issues, such as health, safety, environment and ethics facing the public health professional in the workplace.

The module is assessed via the planning, implementation and analysis of a qualitative study, development and evaluation of a health promotion strategy, and evidence and reflection of the group working process

Science Research Methods and Proposal

You will take this module if you are studying a science degree and complete a hypothesis-driven research project at Level 6 of your degree studies. It is delivered though lectures, tutorials and workshops.

You develop a proposal for your research project, which includes an explanation of the project targeted at both a specialist audience and the general public, and details of experimental design and statistical analysis to be employed. The proposal considers academic beneficiaries and economic, environmental and societal impacts. Project costs are estimated on the basis of a full economic costing model. In addition, the proposal is supported by a targeted CV.

A short lecture series at the start of the academic year provides you with an introduction to the module and advice on completing the research proposal documentation, followed by a series of assessment centre-style workshops and tasks which help assign you to a specific research project area and supervisor. These tasks familiarise you with the type of activities you might face during the application, interview and selection procedures.

You must produce a research proposal for your individual project. You are supported by a series of meetings with your supervisor to provide feedback on your progress.

For the proposal to be considered you must acquire ethical clearance from the School Research Ethics Committee. Once you are allocated a project you join discipline-based tutorials with other students. Each discipline operates tutorial sessions, which are used to provide academic guidance and support for completing ethical clearance documentation and the proposal. A series of research methodology-based workshops introduce you to various experimental designs and statistical techniques relevant to your discipline. These sessions also demonstrate how you can use software such as Minitab, SPSS and Excel to present and analyse datasets. These workshops help you decide on the design and analysis of the data associated with your project.

The module is assessed by you successfully acquiring ethical clearance (pass/fail) and submitting a completed research project proposal and supporting CV (100%).

 

Year 3 optional placement year

Final-year core modules

Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics

You explore a range of concepts and practical issues associated with the role of diet as a therapeutic measure in various diseases. Strong emphasis is placed on the relationship between clinical data and the nutritional management of patients and you investigate methods of nutritional assessment and diet planning.

You benefit from the knowledge and experience of professional dieticians from local NHS trusts, who visit and explain topics such as the principles of nutritional intervention for eating disorders

Food Product Development

You learn to successfully project manage food products through a new product development (NPD) cycle. You go through the stages required to launch a new food product, from conception of the idea to product launch, and evaluate the product through sensory and non-sensory techniques.
You work to develop a new food product aimed at a specific target market, typically associated with nutritional diseases (e.g. Celiac Sufferers, Renal Patients, Diabetes, etc.), and you apply key nutritional knowledge from research into developing a new product for one of these groups.

Lectures and tutorials deliver the core concepts of the module, while you also complete an individual report based on the product development project as part of your assessment

Functional Food

You examine issues surrounding the increasingly economically important area of functional foods. You cover topics such as defining functionality, potential benefits to human health and whether these claims can be substantiated, sources of functional food ingredients, UK and European legislation, analysing specified micronutrients and marketing issues. You examine the key issues surrounding functional foods, critically analyse the claims made for functional food ingredients, assess the effectiveness of functional food products and their potential for health improvement, and implement functional food labelling strategies in the context of relevant UK and EU legislation.

Science Research Project

You bring together a range of practical and academic skills, developed in previous years of study, to interrogate a particular aspect of your field of study. You specialise in a particular area of science, supported by an appointed research supervisor who will act as a mentor and guide you through the development and completion of your research project.

You are required to present a poster and abstract at the School’s annual Poster Day event, which is attended by academics of the School, external examiners, and professionals from the region. The poster contributes to your final project mark. Throughout the project you are expected to maintain systematic and reliable records of your research which are reviewed on a regular basis by your supervisor and assessed at the end of the project. You submit your research in the style of a paper which could be submitted to an appropriate scientific journal related to your discipline.

The module is assessed by a poster presentation (20%) and the submission of a journal paper supported by a research diary and/or laboratory notebook (80%).

Sports Nutrition

This module provides you with an opportunity to gain in-depth understanding of the nutritional and metabolic demands of exercise and of the interactions between diet, exercise and health. You also gain practical experience of how nutrition influences sports performance. The content and delivery of this module provides you with training in sport and exercise nutrition which will equip you for future careers in research, industry or in applied sports nutrition support.

 

Modules offered may vary.

 

How you learn

You are expected to attend a range of lectures, small-group tutorials and hands-on laboratory sessions. The work for the practical investigative projects in Year 2 is largely student centred but includes some elements of formal instruction. Part of your course also involves a substantial research-based project.

The course provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (such as lectures, tutorials, laboratory work, projects, examinations), but you are also expected to spend time on your own - self-study time - to review lecture notes, prepare coursework assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 120 credits and each unit of credit corresponds to ten hours of learning and assessment (contact hours plus self-study hours). So, during one year of full-time study you can expect to have 1,200 hours of learning and assessment.

One module in each year of your study, excluding your first year (Level 3), involves a compulsory one-week block delivery period. This intensive problem-solving week, provides you with an opportunity to focus your attention on particular problems and enhance your team-working and employability skills.

How you are assessed

Your course involves a range of assessments including coursework assignments and examinations.


Our Disability Services team helps students with additional needs resulting from disabilities such as sensory impairment or learning difficulties such as dyslexia
Find out more about our disability services

Find out more about financial support
Find out more about our course related costs

 
 

Entry requirements

Entry requirements

Call us on 0800 952 0226 about our entry requirements

For additional information please see the entry requirements in our admissions section

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country


You can gain considerable knowledge from work, volunteering and life. Under recognition of prior learning (RPL) you may be awarded credit for this which can be credited towards the course you want to study.
Find out more about RPL

 

Employability

Work placement

We produce graduates with the problem-solving and leadership skills necessary to forge successful careers.

This programme allows you to spend an optional year - in-between your second year and final year - learning and developing your skills through work experience. You have a dedicated work placement officer and the University's award-winning careers service to help you with applying for a placement. Advice is also available on job hunting and networking. Employers are often invited to our School to meet you and present you with opportunities for work placements.

By taking a work placement year you gain experience favoured by graduate recruiters and develop your technical skillset. You also obtain the transferable skills required in any professional environment. Transferable skills include communication, negotiation, teamwork, leadership, organisation, confidence, self-reliance, problem-solving, being able to work under pressure, and commercial awareness.

Throughout this programme, you get to know prospective employers and extend your professional network. An increasing number of employers view a placement as a year-long interview and, as a result, placements are increasingly becoming an essential part of an organisation's pre-selection strategy in their graduate recruitment process.

Potential benefits from completing a work placement year include:

  • improved job prospects
  • enhanced employment skills and improved career progression opportunities
  • a higher starting salary than your full-time counterparts
  • a better degree classification
  • a richer CV
  • a year's salary before completing your degree
  • experience of workplace culture
  • the opportunity to design and base your final-year project within a working environment.

Career opportunities

This course offers a wide range of career opportunities. Roles range from being responsible for food safety through nutrition and health promotion to developing new food products. Some graduates enter into the teaching profession. In fact, graduates could find employment in any sector related to food production, food processing and packaging, food transport, food safety, nutrition and health promotion, catering or retail. For those with an interest in dietetics, the course provides a basis for entry to professionally accredited postgraduate courses.


 
 

Full-time

Entry to 2018/19 academic year

Fee for UK/EU applicants
£9,250 a year

More details about our fees

Fee for non UK/EU applicants
Find out more

What is included in your tuition fee?

  • Length: 4 years (including a foundation year) or 5 years with additional work placement year
  • UCAS code: DB60 BSc/FNFY
  • Call us on 0800 952 0226 about our entry requirements

Apply online (full-time) through UCAS

 

Part-time

  • Not available part-time
 

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