Undergraduate study
Financial Mathematics (with Foundation Year)

Financial Mathematics (with Foundation Year)
BSc (Hons)

 
 

Course overview

This extended degree course is ideal if you wish to study for a university degree but you don’t have the appropriate qualifications for direct entry to year 1 of the degree. The foundation year helps you develop your knowledge in mathematics and other important subjects to enable you to proceed confidently through the remainder of the course.

Mathematics provides an essential basis for understanding modern finance. This course combines a grounding in mathematical concepts and methods with an opportunity to develop skills that can be applied to the analysis and modelling of financial markets. As a financial mathematics graduate, a range of career options are available to you - from banking, insurance, to teaching and local government.

The essentials of finance and underlying economic theory are studied alongside mathematics. Throughout the course emphasis is placed on problem solving and real-world applications.A wide variety of career options are available to financial mathematics graduates in the financial services sector, including working as an actuary, in accountancy, banking, insurance, investment management and management consultancy. In the public sector specialists in mathematics and finance are employed in the civil service, local government and other organisations such as the NHS. The course also provides a sound basis for finance, economics, econometrics, logistics, mathematics, statistics and many other areas.Earning potential differs depending on occupation and location. Maths teacher salaries on average range from £33,000 - £39,000 a year. As a financial analyst you could earn £30,000 - £50,000 a year and as a financial controller your earnings could be between £40,000 - £60,000 a year.

 

Course details

In the foundation year (Year 0), you study a range of mathematics and fundamental science and engineering subjects, and you develop transferrable skills to prepare you for the remainder of your course. The remaining years of the course are identical to our BSc (Hons) Financial Mathematics degree. 

Year 1 contains an introduction to all the main areas of mathematics. In Year 2 you build on these foundations to gain more specialist knowledge and you have the opportunity to work on a real industrial case-study to apply your knowledge. 

Group projects in Year 1 and Year 2 are key to developing your communication skills through independent learning and team work, providing you with practical skills essential to your career. The Year 2 group project is a finance-related case-study, which allows you to apply your knowledge and build your work experience. 

The optional work placement year during Year 3 provides valuable work experience that helps you to stand out when applying for your first graduate job. It’s your chance to apply the academic knowledge in a work environment and improve your career prospects. It can even lead to the offer of a permanent job with your placement employer.

The final year is devoted to advanced courses in financial mathematics alongside completing your specialist project in an area of mathematics that interests you. The specialist project provides a unique opportunity to explore a subject in greater depth, guided throughout by your project supervisor.

Course structure

Year 0 (foundation year) core modules

Big Data

Big data – it’s a phrase that a lot of people would argue is overused, or at least not always used in the appropriate context. So what is it really? How is it made and how do we make sense of it?

In this module you learn how big data is not just abundant but a growing field in so many aspects of our society from policing and conservation to health and bioinformatics. You explore how groups and communities use and share big data to help keep themselves safe in disaster zones around the world. You begin to value the role data plays in helping to make sense of community relationships in society, from uncovering criminal networks, tracking disease outbreaks to developing a deeper understanding of our ecology.

Data might end up in a data-frame spreadsheet format but it doesn’t begin there. It is often created with people and animals engaging with each other and technology. You explore how search engines collate and store the data we need to help make predictions, enhance decision making, or simply to better understand society’s needs.

Engineering Principles

Global Grand Challenges

This module focuses on how science can help address some of the biggest global Grand Challenges that face society. This reflects the University’s focus on externally facing research that makes a real, practical difference to the lives of people and the success of businesses and economies.

You work on a project in a group, to enabling you to develop innovative answers to some of the biggest issues of our time based on five thematic areas – health and wellbeing, resilient and secure societies, digital and creative economy, sustainable environments and learning for the 21st century.

Mathematics in Engineering

Programming for Life

This module provides you with a foundation to the underlying principles of scripting and programming to analyse data. You get hands-on experience of coding solutions to solve problems. You can apply these techniques and knowledge to subject-specific problems.

The first phase involves you learning key concepts, constructs and principles of a script or programme. The second phase introduces you to reusable code in the form of application programming interfaces (APIs) with a view to analysing data.

 

and one optional module

Introduction to Cybercrime

This module provides you with a holistic perspective of the world of cybercrime. You develop your knowledge on current real-world events as the focus of your learning, such as high-profile security breaches and/or recent court cases of particular note. You are also introduced to the wider concepts of digital investigations.

You take part in seminars and engage with current events relating to cybercrime, alongside studying concepts relevant to the real-world practice of cybercrime investigations.

Life on Earth

This module explores the diversity of life on earth and the concept of evolution. You consider Darwin’s theory of evolution through natural selection to demonstrate relationships between species, the principles of taxonomy and speciation, and how they relate to the evolutionary tree.

You are introduced to the physiological processes, cellular organisation, homeostasis, metabolism, growth, reproduction, response to stimuli and adaptation - all hallmarks of living organisms equipping diverse species to survive and thrive.

Life Science

This module focuses on the life sciences from a human perspective. While developing an understanding of human biology you explore the role of different but interconnected life science disciplines in modern life.

While reviewing life science from an interdisciplinary context, relatable to a variety of backgrounds, you examine the major human body systems – cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, nervous, digestive, skeletal and reproductive. This module enables you to appreciate how such knowledge is relevant to issues in health, disease and modern society.

The Role of Enforcement Agencies

This module develops your understanding of the skills to successfully study at undergraduate level in crime scene science and forensics. You are encouraged to reflect on and manage your own learning. We emphasise time management and good learning practices during the module.

These skills are contextualised to give you an insight into how various enforcement agencies work and the investigative process including the use of intelligence. The module also covers the role of support services such as crime scene examiners and forensic laboratories within investigation. You are also introduced to prosecution policies used by enforcement agencies and the alternatives to prosecution.

 

Year 1 core modules

Analysis 1

Exploring Mathematics

Introduction to Macroeconomics

Macroeconomics is a main branch of economics. You study the behaviour of an economy at aggregate level such as, the performance, structure, behaviour, and policy making of an economy as a whole. This is a core module giving you an introduction to main and essential macroeconomic principles, theories and methods of analysis. You cover output and aggregate demand, aggregate supply, business cycles, prices and inflation, unemployment, money and interest rates, monetary and fiscal policy, exchange rates and the balance of payments.

Introduction to Microeconomics

Linear Algebra 1

Probability and Statistics

 

Year 2 core modules

Macroeconomic Theory and Policies

You build on your knowledge and skills obtained from Introduction to Macroeconomics module and focus on intermediate level theories. You develop and enhance your understandings of the behaviour of the economy as a whole, so you can distinguish and critically understand different theoretical models and relate these models to policy debates in the real world.

Mathematical Modelling

Microeconomic Theory and Applications

You examine the central concepts, theories and methods of microeconomics and apply them to a wide range of problems and real-world issues. You cover the theory of consumer and producer behaviour, market efficiency and market failure, the analysis of strategic behaviour using game theory, an introduction to general equilibrium, and microeconomic policy.

Numerical Methods

Statistical Analysis

Vector Analysis and Measure Theory

 

Year 3 work placement

Final-year core modules

Discrete Mathematics

International Finance

This module examines an economy's financial sector, introducing you to the principal concepts and techniques used in analysing financial markets and financial management. It covers four main areas: financial markets and institutions' operation and development; financial management and aspects of corporate finance; policy towards financial markets, including regulation, the role of central banks and the operation of monetary and exchange rate policy; and the derivatives markets and managing risks.

Mathematics Project

Operational Research and Optimisation

Stochastic Processes

 

Modules offered may vary.

 

How you learn

You attend a range of lectures, small-group tutorials and laboratory sessions. 

Your programme also includes a substantial final-year research-based project.

The course provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (such as lectures, tutorials, laboratory work, projects, examinations), but you are also expected to spend time working independently. This self-study time is to review lecture notes, solve tutorial exercises, prepare coursework assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. For example, each 20 credit module typically has around 200 hours of learning time. In most cases, around 60 hours are spent in lectures, tutorials and practicals. The remaining learning time is for you to use to gain a deeper understanding of the subject. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 120 credits and each unit of credit corresponds to 10 hours of learning and assessment (contact hours plus self-study hours). So, during one year of full-time study you can expect to have 1,200 hours of learning and assessment.

One module in each year of your study involves a compulsory one-week block delivery period. This intensive problem-solving week provides you with an opportunity to focus your attention on particular problems and enhance your team-working and employability skills.

How you are assessed

Our assessment strategy tests your subject knowledge, independent thought and skills acquisition. It involves a range of assessments types, including coursework assignments, group project reports and formal examinations.

We use end exams within a number of modules in each year. And we provide an assessment schedule with assessment details and submission deadlines to help with your time management.


Our Disability Services team helps students with additional needs resulting from disabilities such as sensory impairment or learning difficulties such as dyslexia
Find out more about our disability services

Find out more about financial support
Find out more about our course related costs

 
 

Entry requirements

Entry requirements

Offers are usually made in the range of 32-88 tariff points. Non-tariff qualifications are also considered. The level of the tariff point offer will depend on the subjects that you have studied. 

You should have at least Level 2 literacy and numeracy skills. GCSE (grade C or 4) a pass in Level 2 Functional Skills are acceptable.

If you are unsure if your qualifications are eligible for admission, please contact our admissions office for advice.

Eligible applicants are normally invited for interview before an offer is made. The purpose of the interview is to help us determine your potential to succeed and tailor your offer to your individual circumstances. The interview also gives you the opportunity to see our excellent facilities, meet staff and students, and learn more about studying at Teesside University.

We encourage all applicants to attend an interview, but if you are unable to attend an interview we may consider your application based on your UCAS application alone. Online or skype interviews may be possible in some cases.

Non-EU international students who require a student visa to study in the UK must meet, in addition to the academic requirements, the UKVI compliant English language requirement. Please check our international student pages for further information.

For additional information please see the entry requirements in our admissions section

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country


You can gain considerable knowledge from work, volunteering and life. Under recognition of prior learning (RPL) you may be awarded credit for this which can be credited towards the course you want to study.
Find out more about RPL

 

Employability

Career opportunities

All programmes incorporate employability skills development alongside your degree. Our staff utilise their extensive business connections to provide many and varied opportunities to engage with potential employers through fairs, guest lectures, live projects and site visits. In addition we offer a series of workshops and events in all years that ensure you are equipped with both degree-level subject knowledge and the practical skills that employers are looking for in new graduate recruits. 

Our award-winning careers service works with regional and national employers to advertise graduate positions, in addition to providing post-graduation support for all Teesside University alumni.

Work placement

Within this programme you have the opportunity to spend one year learning and developing your skills through work experience. You have a dedicated work placement officer and the University's award-winning careers service to assist you with applying for a placement. Advice is also available on job hunting and networking. Employers are often invited to our School to meet you and present you with opportunities for work placements.

By taking a work placement year you gain experience favoured by graduate recruiters and develop your technical skillset. You also obtain the transferable skills required in any professional environment. Transferable skills include communication, negotiation, teamwork, leadership, organisation, confidence, self-reliance, problem-solving, working under pressure, and commercial awareness. 

Throughout this programme, you get to know prospective employers and extend your professional network. An increasing number of employers view a placement as a year-long interview and as a result, placements are increasingly becoming an essential part of an organisation's pre-selection strategy in their graduate recruitment process.

Potential benefits from completing a work placement year include:

  • improved job prospects
  • enhanced employment skills and improved career progression opportunities
  • a higher starting salary than your full-time counterparts
  • a better degree classification
  • a richer CV
  • a year's salary before completing your degree
  • experience of workplace culture
  • the opportunity to design and base your final-year project within a working environment.

 

Information for international applicants

Qualifications

International applicants - find out what qualifications you need by selecting your country below.

Select your country:

  
 

Useful information

Visit our international pages for useful information for non-UK students and applicants.

Talk to us

Talk to an international student adviser

 
 

Full-time

Entry to 2018/19 academic year

Fee for UK/EU applicants
£9,250 a year

More details about our fees

Fee for non UK/EU applicants
Find out more

What is included in your tuition fee?

  • Length: 4 years (or 5 including a work placement year)
  • Typical offer: Offers are tailored to individual circumstances

Apply online (full-time)

 

Part-time

  • Not available part-time
 

Choose Teesside

iPad

Are you eligible for an iPad, keyboard and £300 credit for learning resources?

 

Accommodation

Live in affordable accommodation right on-campus

 

Campus

Study in our town-centre campus with over £270m of recent investment

 

Industry ready

Benefit from work placements, live projects, accredited courses

 

Get in touch

 
 

Be bold, be immersed, be transformed. Be Teesside.

Find your ideal degree course here at Teesside University and feel welcomed, supported and prepared for the career you want.

 
 
 

Open days

 

17 November 2018
Undergraduate open day

Book now