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Research

Award nomination for documentary on the role of women filmmakers

05 November 2020 @TeessideUni

 

A documentary highlighting the important role which women have played in social realist cinema has been shortlisted for a prestigious arts award.

Teesside University academic Dr Ben Lamb led the team behind the film, which is in the running for an Arts and Humanities Research Council funded Research in Film Award.

The documentary, Details: Social Realist Film by Women, challenges common perceptions of British social realist film by capturing three critically-accomplished filmmakers, Kate Dickie, Tina Ghavari and Morag McKinnon, as they discuss the female directors that inspire them and the unique perspective women have had on social realist cinema.

Dr Lamb, from the University’s School of Social Sciences, Humanities & Law, wrote the documentary with Anna Coatman, of Bloomsbury Publishing.

Award winning filmmaker Samm Haillay, from the University’s School of Computing, Engineering & Digital Technologies produced the documentary. The film was directed by Caitriona MacInnes of Edinburgh Napier University.

Dr Lamb said: 'Social realism as a film genre and movement is widely understood to be a gritty and often visually unadventurous form of filmmaking that focuses on the plight of white working-class men struggling to make a living in deindustrialised communities.

Such a compelling story explores how social realism can and has changed the world and how the representation of women within excluded communities can provide a real-world impact on tackling gender inequality

Dr Ben Lamb

'Our documentary film redresses this imbalance, in telling the story of British social realist films by, and about, working class women and girls and discussing the unique perspective women have provided in social realist cinema worldwide.'

He added: 'Such a compelling story explores how social realism can and has changed the world and how the representation of women within excluded communities can provide a real-world impact on tackling gender inequality.'

The winners will be announced in an online awards ceremony on Wednesday 11 November. The prize is £5,000 which the team hope to be able to use to produce a full-length feature on how women’s social realist film has developed since the 1930s.