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Undergraduate study
Mathematics

Mathematics (with Foundation Year)
BSc (Hons)

G104 BSc/MathFY

 
 
 

Course overview

This extended degree course is ideal if you wish to study for a university degree but you don’t have the appropriate qualifications for direct entry to year 1 of the degree. The foundation year helps you develop your knowledge in maths and other important subjects to enable you to proceed confidently through the remainder of the course.

Mathematics is a highly respected degree with a high demand for mathematicians and statisticians across many sectors, including governmental organisations, engineering, health, finance and banking, space exploration, as well as teaching.

Teesside University's School of Science, Engineering and Design produces graduates with the problem-solving and leadership skills necessary to forge successful careers.

This course develops your knowledge and understanding of maths concepts and methods. It provides you with a strong mathematical foundation and develops your capacity to apply mathematics to real-world problems, including analytical and numerical approaches to modelling and problem-solving.

Group projects in Year 1 and Year 2 develop your communication skills through independent learning and team work, providing you with practical skills essential to your career.

The Year 2 group project is a real industrial case-study, allowing you to apply your knowledge and build your work experience. 

The optional placement year during Year 3 provides valuable work experience that helps you to stand out when applying for your first graduate job. It’s your chance to apply the academic knowledge in a work environment and improve your career prospects. It can even lead to the offer of a permanent job with your placement employer.

In the final year you complete a specialist project, which provides a unique opportunity for you to explore an area of mathematics that interests you in greater depth. You are guided throughout by your project supervisor.

 

Course details

In the foundation year (Year 0), you study a range of mathematics and fundamental science and engineering subjects, and you develop transferrable skills to prepare you for the remainder of your course. The remaining years of the course are identical to the content of our BSc (Hons) Mathematics degree.
 
Year 1 contains an introduction to all the main areas of mathematics. In Year 2, you build on these foundations to gain more specialist knowledge and have the opportunity to work on a real industrial case-study to apply your knowledge. The final year is devoted to advanced courses in pure mathematics, applied mathematics and statistics alongside completing your specialist project.

Course structure

Year 0 (foundation year) core modules

Big Data

Big data – it’s a phrase that a lot of people would argue is overused, or at least not always used in the appropriate context. So what is it really? How is it made and how do we make sense of it?

In this module you learn how big data is not just abundant but a growing field in so many aspects of our society from policing and conservation to health and bioinformatics. You explore how groups and communities use and share big data to help keep themselves safe in disaster zones around the world. You begin to value the role data plays in helping to make sense of community relationships in society, from uncovering criminal networks, tracking disease outbreaks to developing a deeper understanding of our ecology.

Data might end up in a data-frame spreadsheet format but it doesn’t begin there. It is often created with people and animals engaging with each other and technology. You explore how search engines collate and store the data we need to help make predictions, enhance decision making, or simply to better understand society’s needs.

Engineering Principles

You gain an introduction to engineering physical, thermal, fluid, electrical and mechanical systems in engineering and the scientific laws and principles that govern them. You are prepared for further studies involving these principles of engineering science.

The module is delivered in combined lecture/problem solving tutorial sessions. Laboratory practical sessions support the learning objectives. The problem solving tutorials and the practical sessions enhance the understanding of principles.

Global Grand Challenges

This module focuses on how science can help address some of the biggest global Grand Challenges that face society. This reflects the University’s focus on externally facing research that makes a real, practical difference to the lives of people and the success of businesses and economies.

You work on a project in a group, to enabling you to develop innovative answers to some of the biggest issues of our time based on five thematic areas – health and wellbeing, resilient and secure societies, digital and creative economy, sustainable environments and learning for the 21st century.

Mathematics in Engineering

You are introduced to mathematical notation and techniques. The emphasis is on developing the skills that enable you to analyse and solve engineering problems. Topics studied include algebraic manipulation and equations, trigonometry, trigonometric functions and an introduction to descriptive statistics.

The module is delivered during combined lecture/tutorial sessions. Worked examples illustrate how each mathematical technique is applied. Problem solving tutorial exercises give you the opportunity to practice each skills or techniques.

Programming for Life

This module provides you with a foundation to the underlying principles of scripting and programming to analyse data. You get hands-on experience of coding solutions to solve problems. You can apply these techniques and knowledge to subject-specific problems.

The first phase involves you learning key concepts, constructs and principles of a script or programme. The second phase introduces you to reusable code in the form of application programming interfaces (APIs) with a view to analysing data.

 

and one optional module

Introduction to Cybercrime

This module provides you with a holistic perspective of the world of cybercrime. You develop your knowledge on current real-world events as the focus of your learning, such as high-profile security breaches and/or recent court cases of particular note. You are also introduced to the wider concepts of digital investigations.

You take part in seminars and engage with current events relating to cybercrime, alongside studying concepts relevant to the real-world practice of cybercrime investigations.

Life on Earth

You explore the diversity of life on earth and the concept of evolution. You consider Darwin’s theory of evolution through natural selection to demonstrate relationships between species, the principles of taxonomy and speciation, and how they relate to the evolutionary tree.

You are introduced to the physiological processes, cellular organisation, homeostasis, metabolism, growth, reproduction, response to stimuli and adaptation - all hallmarks of living organisms equipping diverse species to survive and thrive.

Life Science

This module focuses on the life sciences from a human perspective. While developing an understanding of human biology you explore the role of different but interconnected life science disciplines in modern life.

While reviewing life science from an interdisciplinary context, relatable to a variety of backgrounds, you examine the major human body systems – cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, nervous, digestive, skeletal and reproductive. This module enables you to appreciate how such knowledge is relevant to issues in health, disease and modern society.

The Role of Enforcement Agencies

This module develops your understanding of the skills to successfully study at undergraduate level in crime scene science and forensics. You are encouraged to reflect on and manage your own learning. We emphasise time management and good learning practices during the module.

These skills are contextualised to give you an insight into how various enforcement agencies work and the investigative process including the use of intelligence. The module also covers the role of support services such as crime scene examiners and forensic laboratories within investigation. You are also introduced to prosecution policies used by enforcement agencies and the alternatives to prosecution.

 

Year 1 core modules

Analysis 1

The module gives a solid foundation to the properties of the real numbers and of continuous functions of one real variable. You develop the mathematical skills and techniques of fundamental operations with limits, and develop skills in using mathematical terminology and style of reasoning in order to solve problems.

Lectures introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving seminars based on weekly worksheets provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of these.

Analysis 2

This module deepens your mathematical knowledge in analysis to include the techniques of differentiation and integration in one real variable. The fundamental functions (exp, log, sin, cos, tan) are defined accurately and their properties outlined. Important applications like finding local extrema of functions, approximation through Taylor expansion, or the solution of elementary ODEs is presented, their mathematical eligibility proven, and their execution practised.

Lectures are used to introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving seminars based on weekly worksheets provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of these.

Exploring Mathematics

The module provides a general introduction to problem solving. You develop personal and team-working skills and the importance of communicating mathematics in both written and oral form. You develop your reflective and professional skills, gaining recognition of the benefits with respect to your academic progress and subsequent lifelong learning.

A group-based learning approach is adopted and where appropriate, supporting lectures/seminars introduce techniques and underlying principles. IT laboratory sessions are used to introduce you to specialist software.

Linear Algebra 1

This module gives a solid foundation to Linear Algebra topics. You develop the mathematical skills and techniques of fundamental operations of vectors and matrices, and skills in selecting and applying Linear Algebra techniques to solve problems.

Lectures are used to introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving tutorials provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of these.

Linear Algebra 2

This module deepens your mathematical knowledge in Linear Algebra to include Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, and extend your base of techniques to solve a variety of problems. The emphasis is on developing competence in the identification of the most appropriate method to solve a given problem and its subsequent application.

Lectures are used to introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving tutorials provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of these.

Probability and Statistics

You are introduced to the concepts of statistics and probability. You develop a conceptual understanding of basic statistical and probability methods, supported by the use of a statistical computer package.

Lectures are used to introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving seminars/laboratory sessions provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of these.

 

Year 2 core modules

Algebraic Structures

This module introduces you to Algebraic Structures. This topic, also known as algebra or abstract algebra, broadens the mind to mathematics beyond the common number systems and is crucial for a deeper understanding of many other branches of mathematics such as topology, differential equations, geometry, analysis and number theory.

The module extends your base of techniques beyond linear algebra to solve a variety of algebraic problems.

Lectures introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving seminars based on weekly worksheets provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of these techniques.

Integral Transforms and Matrices

You deepen your mathematical knowledge in key areas to use in a number of techniques to solve problems that arise in engineering domains. You develop competence in identifying the most appropriate method to solve a problem and its application.

You are introduced to the techniques and principles, and you are provided with problems that develop your competency in applying these techniques. You are shown how to implement numerical methods using software techniques.

Mathematical Modelling

You use mathematics as a tool to solve problems using a range of real-world problems to motivate the use of various techniques. Additionally, varying tools are used to implement and calculate solutions. You gain a range of mathematical modelling skills to solve problems.

Lectures are used to introduce principles and concepts. Tutorials involve pen-and-paper as well as computer-based exercises to consolidate and develop your understanding and skills.

Numerical Methods

This module focuses on applying your mathematical knowledge of differential equations to real-world problems. You are introduced to Numerical Methods and extend your base of techniques to solve a variety of problems. The emphasis is on developing competence in the identification of the most appropriate method to solve a given problem and its subsequent application.

Lectures are used to introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving seminars provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of these. You are shown how to implement numerical methods using appropriate software tools.

Statistical Analysis

This module provides a practical understanding of the useful modelling techniques of regression analysis and analysis of variance. The module instils an understanding and relevance of linear regression models facilitated through the use of a statistical computer package.

Lectures are used to introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving seminars in IT laboratories provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of these. You are shown how to implement numerical methods using appropriate software tools.

Vector Analysis and Measure Theory

This module extends the mathematical knowledge in analysis by treating the case of vector-valued functions of several variables and their differentiation. Important applications, such as determining local extrema and approximation through Tayler expansion are discussed, for functions of several variables, and, if appropriate, the vector valued case. The integration theory in several variables follows the measure-theoretic approach of Lebesgue. Applications include surface integrals, volume integrals and line integrals, and sketch their relevance in mechanics and electrodynamics.

Lectures are used to introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving seminars based on weekly worksheets provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of these techniques.

 

Year 3 work placement

Final-year core modules

Data Analysis

This module introduces mathematical techniques for the processing and analysing massive datasets. In particular the module discusses how to pre-process and store massive datasets and to design efficient algorithms.

Lectures introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem- solving seminars provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of methods learned in the lectures.

Discrete Mathematics

This module develops knowledge and understanding of topics in Discrete Mathematics and in particular graph theory such as graphs, paths and cycles, Euler tours, connectivity, trees, spanning trees, planar graphs, graph colouring and random graphs. This knowledge is applied to obtain and analyse models of real-world networks, for example in transport systems and computer networks (network optimisation problems like shortest path, minimum cut, minimum spanning tree, travelling salesman.)

Lectures introduce techniques and underlying principles. Problem-solving seminars provide the opportunity for you to demonstrate understanding and develop competence in the application of methods learned in the lectures.

Mathematics Project

This module extends independent learning skills by allowing you to investigate an area of mathematics that interests you for an extended period. Training is given in scientific writing and you produce a dissertation of the work covered. Your individual work can take the form of a research project or a literature review. Key skills in research, knowledge application and creation are developed through keynote lectures where appropriate and self-managed independent study. Support is provided throughout by your project supervisor.

Operational Research and Optimisation

This group project module is designed to develop awareness and understanding of operational research methods applicable to analysis of financial and economic data. You are introduced to numerical optimisation theories and processes and have the opportunity to develop theoretical and applied knowledge in optimisation problems within the financial domain.

Stochastic Processes

The basic concepts of stochastic processes is introduced. The examples of stochastic processes in real-life is introduced and the behaviours of these models discussed. Some integral calculations are developed. You are guided to acquire both the mathematical principles necessary to create, analyse and apply models in engineering and scientific research.

 

Modules offered may vary.

 

How you learn

You attend a range of lectures, small-group tutorials and laboratory sessions. 

Your programme also includes a substantial final-year research-based project.

The course provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (such as lectures, tutorials, laboratory work, projects, examinations), but you are also expected to spend time working independently. This self-study time is to review lecture notes, solve tutorial exercises, prepare coursework assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. For example, each 20 credit module typically has around 200 hours of learning time. In most cases, around 40 hours are spent in lectures, tutorials and practicals. The remaining learning time is for you to use to gain a deeper understanding of the subject. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 120 credits and each unit of credit corresponds to 10 hours of learning and assessment (contact hours plus self-study hours). So, during one year of full-time study you can expect to have 1,200 hours of learning and assessment.

One module in each year involves a compulsory one-week block delivery period. This intensive problem-solving week provides you with an opportunity to focus your attention on particular problems and enhance your team-working and employability skills.

All programmes incorporate employability skills development alongside your degree. Our staff utilise their extensive business connections to provide many and varied opportunities to engage with potential employers through fairs, guest lectures, live projects and site visits. In addition we offer a series of workshops and events in all years that ensure you are equipped with both degree-level subject knowledge and the practical skills that employers are looking for in new graduate recruits.

How you are assessed

Our assessment strategy tests your subject knowledge, independent thought and skills acquisition. It involves a range of assessments types, including coursework assignments, group project reports and formal examinations.

We use end exams within a number of modules in each year. And we provide an assessment schedule with assessment details and submission deadlines to help with your time management.


Our Disability Services team provide an inclusive and empowering learning environment and have specialist staff to support disabled students access any additional tailored resources needed. If you have a specific learning difficulty, mental health condition, autism, sensory impairment, chronic health condition or any other disability please contact a Disability Services as early as possible.
Find out more about our disability services

Find out more about financial support
Find out more about our course related costs

 
 

Entry requirements

Entry requirements

Offers are usually made in the range of 32-88 tariff points. Non-tariff qualifications are also considered. The level of the tariff point offer will depend on the subjects that you have studied. 

You should have at least Level 2 literacy and numeracy skills. GCSE (grade C or 4) a pass in Level 2 Functional Skills are acceptable.

If you are unsure your qualifications are eligible for admission, please contact our admissions office for advice.

Eligible applicants are normally invited for interview before an offer is made. The purpose of the interview is to help us determine your potential to succeed and tailor your offer to your individual circumstances. The interview also gives you the opportunity to see our excellent facilities, meet staff and students, and learn more about studying at Teesside University.

We encourage all applicants to attend an interview, but if you are unable to attend an interview we may consider your application based on your UCAS application alone. Online or skype interviews may be possible in some cases.

Non-EU international students who require a student visa to study in the UK must meet, in addition to the academic requirements, the UKVI compliant English language requirement. Please check our international student pages for further information.

For additional information please see our entry requirements

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country


You can gain considerable knowledge from work, volunteering and life. Under recognition of prior learning (RPL) you may be awarded credit for this which can be credited towards the course you want to study.
Find out more about RPL

 

Employability

Career opportunities

Our award-winning careers service works with regional and national employers to advertise graduate positions, in addition to providing post-graduation support for all Teesside University alumni.

According to prospects.ac.uk, the jobs directly relevant to mathematics graduates include:

  • actuarial analyst
  • actuary
  • chartered accountant
  • data analyst
  • investment analyst
  • research scientist (maths)
  • secondary school teacher
  • statistician
  • systems developer.

Typical employers include:

  • NHS
  • local and central government
  • educational establishments
  • pharmaceutical industry
  • IT companies
  • engineering companies
  • insurance companies
  • market research and marketing companies
  • finance, banking and accountancy firms.

Work placement

Within this programme you have the opportunity to spend one year learning and developing your skills through work experience. You have a dedicated work placement officer and the University's award-winning careers service to assist you with applying for a placement. Advice is also available on job hunting and networking. Employers are often invited to our School to meet you and present you with opportunities for work placements.

By taking a work placement year you gain experience favoured by graduate recruiters and develop your technical skillset. You also obtain the transferable skills required in any professional environment. Transferable skills include communication, negotiation, teamwork, leadership, organisation, confidence, self-reliance, problem-solving, working under pressure, and commercial awareness. 

Throughout this programme, you get to know prospective employers and extend your professional network. An increasing number of employers view a placement as a year-long interview and as a result, placements are increasingly becoming an essential part of an organisation's pre-selection strategy in their graduate recruitment process.

Potential benefits from completing a work placement year include:

  • improved job prospects
  • enhanced employment skills and improved career progression opportunities
  • a higher starting salary than your full-time counterparts
  • a better degree classification
  • a richer CV
  • a year's salary before completing your degree
  • experience of workplace culture
  • the opportunity to design and base your final-year project within a working environment.

 

Information for international applicants

Qualifications

International applicants - find out what qualifications you need by selecting your country below.

Select your country:

  
 

Useful information

Visit our international pages for useful information for non-UK students and applicants.

Talk to us

Talk to an international student adviser

 
 

Full-time

Entry to 2019/20 academic year

Fee for UK/EU applicants
£9,250 a year

More details about our fees

Fee for international applicants
£11,825 a year

More details about our fees for international applicants


What is included in your tuition fee?

  • Length: 4 years (or 5 including a work placement year)
  • UCAS code: G104 BSc/MathFY
  • Semester dates
  • Typical offer: Offers are tailored to individual circumstances

Apply online (full-time) through UCAS

 

Part-time

  • Not available part-time
 
 
 
 

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Open days

 
 

16 November 2019
Undergraduate open day

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