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Creative students aim to make a positive change through creative thinking

12 October 2021 @TeessideUni

 

Ten students from Teesside University have been recognised in an international awards scheme for creative projects which focus on social or environmental impact.

Creative Conscience – Screenshot of Srija Shrestha’s animation project
Creative Conscience – Screenshot of Srija Shrestha’s animation project

The students from Teesside University’s MIMA School of Art & Design submitted entries to the 2021 Creative Conscience Awards which recognise creative projects which create change in the world.

MA Illustrations student Srija Shrestha was Highly Commended for her animation which looked at how to encourage people in her home country of Nepal to talk more about their emotions.

Other students from Teesside University’s MIMA School of Art & Design whose work was shortlisted in the awards were: Julie Bennett, Rachael Blackburn, Raquel Fernandez, Tinna Halldorsdottir (Commended), Megan Howard (Commended), Tina Nguyen (Commended), Sarah Parker, Kelly Thorne and Natalie Williams.

Third year BA (Hons) Fashion student, Sarah Parker created her project ‘Survive’ to represent the freedom felt by survivors of trauma.

Sarah designed a collection of vinyl boiler suits and satin underwear after researching victims of assault from the U.S. Department of Justice.

She said: ‘I was originally looking at the problem of the U.S. government restricting the time to get an abortion in some states, even in cases of incest and rape.

‘As I was looking into this, I was shocked at the negative attitude and beliefs of some of the US court officials’ opinions on rape victims.

We are incredibly proud of our student’s achievements and to have been a part of their creative journey as emerging thinkers and makers with the vision to effect change through their creativity.

Laura Sillars, MIMA Director and Dean of MIMA School of Art & Design.

‘The boiler suits, inspired by prison uniforms and straitjackets, represent the invisible prison that victims are often put in by their attacker and those who don’t believe them or blame them.

‘I created my collection to raise awareness of the victims of assault and those who don’t report their assault due to fear of being blamed, embarrassed, or not being believed.

‘Ideally, I’d like people to see my project and change their perspective in terms of the damage and life-changing effects trauma can have on victims of assault.

‘If we can change people’s mindset, a lot of other positive changes could follow.’

Sarah’s work can be seen at the 2021 graduate degree show and has been shortlisted for the first time, for an award at the for the Creative Conscience Global Awards.

Laura Sillars, MIMA Director and Dean of MIMA School of Art & Design commented: ‘We are incredibly proud of our student’s achievements and to have been a part of their creative journey as emerging thinkers and makers with the vision to effect change through their creativity.’

The Creative Conscience awards give students the opportunity to explore their curiosity of the world and make positive changes through their creative thinking.