Postgraduate study
Criminology & Sociology

MSc Criminology

This programme has been developed in response to the need of statutory, voluntary and private organisations involved in developing crime reduction strategies. It creates and examines research-based evidence of which strategies work.

Course information

Full-time

  • within 1 year

More full-time details

Part-time

  • 2 years

More part-time details

  • Tuesdays or Thursdays 5.00pm - 7.00pm (one module 5.00pm - 9.00pm)
  • Enrolment date: September
  • Admission enquiries: 01642 384491

Contact details

  • Facilities

    School of Social Sciences, Business & Law facilities

    The School of Social Sciences, Business & Law has fantastic state-of-the-art facilities that reflect the broad range of courses it offers. From a hydrotherapy pool and environmental chamber to a replica courtroom and crime scene house, students have access to the kind of equipment they will go on to use throughout their careers.

 

You develop expertise in theory, method and research as well as a broad understanding of the criminal justice system and an in-depth knowledge of current issues in criminology. You explore contemporary crime, victimisation and crime reduction.

Modules

Core modules

Contemporary Criminal Justice

The module gives you a substantive overview of the criminal justice field. It raises a range of key questions, issues and themes in contemporary society. You look at a number of important areas within a conceptual framework that is underpinned by procedures, processes, power and politics.

Contemporary Criminological Theory

The module shares the concerns of contemporary sociological theory with modernity and post modernity, gender identity and cultural change as key components in explaining the proliferation of criminality and deviance in contemporary society.

Dissertation

You plan and execute a piece of original, empirical or theoretical, research and write a 20,000-word dissertation on a criminological topic of your choice. For the MSc Criminology (Contemporary Drug Issues), this must be a drug-related topic.

Social Research Methods

This module focuses on the study of both quantitative and qualitative research methods. It introduces the philosophical paradigms which are central to both approaches and how these interact to produce the methods utilised. The module allows you to not only view these methods from a theoretical / academic perspective but also to engage in practicalities of these methodologies using data provided in seminars and assessment.

Victims and Offenders

This module views a variety of crimes from the perspective of victims and offenders. This includes violence against women, which is currently at the forefront of international, national and local policy agendas. It encompasses, domestic violence, honour crimes, rape and sexual assault, sexual harassment, trafficking in women and exploitation in the sex industry.

You also critically analyse perceptions relating to young people and their involvement in crime, both as offenders and victims. Media representations of the 'growing problem' of disorderly youth, gangs and violence are explored. Violent and serious crime in a wider context is also considered and the module provides an opportunity to develop discussions around the debates focused on victims and offenders who experience these types of crime.

There is a focus on criminal justice and policy initiatives, crime prevention strategies and community responses to the 'problem of crime'.

 

Modules offered may vary.

How you learn

Learning includes a variety of methods such as lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, computer-assisted learning, discussions, guided reading, case studies, research exercises and projects, and research using conventional library sources. Some of the learning and teaching methods are combined in sessions.

The usual weekly two-hour session per module is used to enable you to acquire knowledge of the issues relating to criminology and criminal justice as well as research methods. Interactive learning in the form of discussion also takes place in those weekly sessions, especially the latter part of the session, which is used to build upon the lectures provided in the former part.

Support is provided outside the classroom environment. Virtual and interactive learning environments are also used to provide learning resources for each module and to enable you to discuss the course material with other students and with the teaching staff outside the classroom thus maximising your learning experience.

How you are assessed

Modules are assessed by a combination of formative and summative assessments. Formative assessment includes seminar exercises and group oral presentations, whereas summative assessment ranges from essays and case studies to structured project and knowledge checks based upon preparatory readings.

Career opportunities

Opportunities exist in the criminal justice system (including the police, prison, probation and youth offending services). This programme is also ideal if you're interested in working (or already work) in social services and related voluntary agencies. Some of our MSc students continue to doctoral studies and/or work at colleges and universities.

Entry requirements

Applicants should normally have a good second-class honours degree in a relevant field. However, those who have relevant professional qualifications and/or relevant experience will also be considered.

For additional information please see the entry requirements in our admissions section

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country

Course information

Full-time

  • within 1 year

More full-time details

Part-time

  • 2 years

More part-time details

  • Tuesdays or Thursdays 5.00pm - 7.00pm (one module 5.00pm - 9.00pm)
  • Enrolment date: September
  • Admission enquiries: 01642 384491

Contact details

Open days

Postgraduate prospectusRequest a prospectus

If you would like more information about our courses or the University, please register with us.