Postgraduate study
Criminology & Sociology

MSc Social Research Methods (Criminology)*

This programme helps you to develop skills which will enable you to conduct social research. It is relevant if you are wanting to improve or develop your ability to research and evaluate policy and practice ethically and professionally. This course is suitable if you are wishing to conduct research in an academic setting or pursue a career in as a social researcher.

Course information

Full-time

  • within 1 year

More full-time details

September 2018 entry

Part-time

More part-time details

September 2018 entry

Contact details

Further information

  • Facilities

    School of Social Sciences, Business & Law facilities

    The School of Social Sciences, Business & Law has fantastic state-of-the-art facilities that reflect the broad range of courses it offers. From a hydrotherapy pool and environmental chamber to a replica courtroom and crime scene house, students have access to the kind of equipment they will go on to use throughout their careers.

 

Course structure

Core modules

Conceptualising and Designing Social Research

This module introduces you to the relationship between philosophy, theory and social research. This includes an examination of the different and competing positions of interpretivism and positivism and an exploration of the major debates in epistemology. Similarly, the relationship between theory and social research are analysed using a selection of theoretical positions such as, post-structuralism and critical realism. Techniques of data analysis and considerations of ethics in the design of a social research project are also examined.

You explore how these debates inform and underpin choices made when designing social research, and draw upon this knowledge to design a research bid. You are assessed by way of a research bid which details the aims and outcomes of the research, methodology, and dissemination strategy, and includes supporting statements on philosophy and theory. (7,500 words)

Qualitative Data Analysis using NVivo

This module explores different techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It also critically engages with key epistemological, ontological and theoretical debates relating to the analysis of qualitative data, to help you understand the range of factors that influence how researchers make decisions about which analytical techniques to adopt. Hands-on experience and practice at making choices about data analysis will help you build skills in this respect.

You are also introduced to NVivo and will set up a project using the latest version of NVivo. These sessions will guide you on how to effectively store, manage, code and analyse data using NVivo.

Regression Analysis: Concepts and Issues

This module covers three major forms of regression analysis - multiple regression, logistic regression and ANOVA. It focuses on the use of such techniques, the underlying concepts and the issues often associated with them. Emphasis is placed on use, understanding and interpretation of these various approaches to regression analysis using PASW.

Social Research Methods

This module focuses on the study of both quantitative and qualitative research methods. It introduces the philosophical paradigms which are central to both approaches and how these interact to produce the methods utilised. The module allows you to not only view these methods from a theoretical / academic perspective but also to engage in practicalities of these methodologies using data provided in seminars and assessment.

Social Research Project

You conduct independent research, which is written up as a research report of potentially publishable quality – either a journal article or a report to a client. It should demonstrate, along with appendicised material, that you have met the learning objectives of this course.

You have the scope to demonstrate your skills and knowledge in a sustained piece of independent work that can enhance your CV.

 

Modules offered may vary.

How you learn

You learn by: attending lectures and seminars; discussing key readings; through group and individual activities and exercises; through debate and discussion with staff and other students; through informal and formal feedback on assignments; and through one-to-one teaching with members of academic staff.

How you are assessed

You are assessed through a wide variety of methods including qualitative and quantitative research and analysis exercises, written reports, essays, CV development and an original piece of research which is written up as an article or report (dissertation).

Career opportunities

Graduates are equipped to work within local government, education, health, the cultural sector, or anywhere where policies and practices are evaluated and inform future development. Graduates also work in employment arenas where it is important to submit well-crafted and conceptualised bids and proposals for projects. It is an appropriate course for those wanting to progress their current careers by increasing their research skills.

Entry requirements

Applicants should normally have a good second-class honours degree in a relevant field. However, those who have relevant professional qualifications and/or relevant experience will also be considered.

For additional information please see the entry requirements in our admissions section

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country

* Subject to University approval

Course information

Full-time

  • within 1 year

More full-time details

September 2018 entry

Part-time

More part-time details

September 2018 entry

Contact details

Further information