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Undergraduate study
 
 

Course overview

Human biology involves the study of the human body and how it is adapted to its environment. This course is designed to equip you with a broad-based understanding of the human body in health and disease. It develops your knowledge of human biology, with a focus on the medical aspects of human processes, such as how we respond to infection and the effects of drugs on the human body.

You can complete an optional work placement year as part of this degree course at no extra cost.

You learn about the physiology of the major systems of the body, about the impact of nutrition and environment on health, and about human development and evolution.

The course includes practical classes that provide first-hand experience of biology, genetics and human physiology and anatomy. This helps you develop comprehensive knowledge and skills relevant to current industry and employer requirements. You also carry out research-based projects from a wide choice that involve either hands-on research or further study.

This degree course equips you with knowledge and understanding that will allow you to follow a career path in science, health or industry.

You study at Teesside University’s Middlesbrough campus, but have the opportunity to gain valuable experience at the new National Horizons Centre at the University’s Darlington campus which is home to a range of state-of-the-art facilities. This £22m purpose-built biosciences research, education and training facility is a focal point for the growing regional biosciences community.

 

Course details

In years 1 and 2 you focus on a number of key discipline-based topics – biological methods, cell biology and microbiology, human development, and human metabolism and clinical biochemistry.

The final-year modules, which include Health Product Development, Drugs and Toxicology, and Sports Nutrition, integrate the key concepts and heighten awareness of the continuing advances in biological sciences and their impact on other disciplines. You also develop your independent learning skills in your final year by undertaking a hypothesis-driven research project in human biology.

The course also develops skills and attributes which prepare you for the world of work. For example, you undertake a series of intensive projects - these mimic real-life situations and help you become an effective member of a team.

Course structure

Year 1 core modules

Anatomy and Physiology

You gain a basic knowledge of human body structure and to relate this knowledge to both the understanding of the mechanisms associated with the control and regulation of physiological processes of the major organs systems of the body. This will allow you to develop ability to apply, evaluate and interpret the knowledge to solve problems in the discipline. You also develop applied contexts of the knowledge such as the construction of biological profiles for human identification including sex, age at death, stature determination and biological affinity. The module will be delivered through lectures, computer- aided learning via interactive web-based activities and labs.

Biochemistry and Chemical Science

You will develop an understanding of key concepts necessary to underpin subsequent studies in chemistry, biochemistry, biomedical sciences and molecular biology. Building of the underlying principles of chemistry is essential to understand complex biological systems. This module will introduce the fundamentals of chemistry and link them to the key biomolecules and biochemical processes which form the basis of life.

Biodiversity and Evolution

You study the concept of evolution and how it led to the development of biodiversity and the world we now inhabit. You discuss evolution by natural selection and our development from the common ancestor, along with the principles of taxonomy, speciation and the evolutionary tree to demonstrate relationships between species. We highlight the impact of modern molecular methods of taxonomy in the form of phylogenetics, particularly the discovery of the domain of archaea. We discuss the complex biodiversity of the microbial, plant and animal worlds and their importance in ecological balance for the earth, human kind and society in the form of conservation. Lectures and tutorial sessions provide an insight into the theoretical aspects of evolution and biodiversity, and you discuss and analyse problem-based exercises to affirm your theoretical knowledge.

Cell Biology

You increase your understanding of biological processes at the cellular level. You will explore eukaryotic cell architecture and function with a molecular and mammalian focus, and learn about cell division and the cell cycle, genetic organisation of cells, DNA replication and gene expression. Your exploration of these aspects of cell and molecular biology will be supported by a series of laboratory-based sessions.

Food Science and Nutrition

This module provides you with an introduction to the fundamental concepts that underpin modern food science and nutrition. This includes a review of the composition of food, in terms of macronutrients and micronutrients. You also look at energy in food and the consequences of malnutrition, addressing the question of how to translate our understanding of food and nutrition science into public health initiatives that actually change people’s behaviour for the better.

This translational science agenda provides the rationale for the course and introduces you to the issues surrounding food, nutrition and translational science

Pathology

You gain an overview of normal histology and cytology of major organs and systems of the human body and molecular and cellular factors underpinning the pathology of common diseases. The causes, mechanisms and extent of disease are examined, as well as adaptations to injury, such as apoptosis and necrosis (death of living cells or tissues), autophagy, inflammation, wound healing, and neoplasia (abnormal new growth of cells).

 

Year 2 core modules

Clinical Pharmacology

You focus on treating and preventing disease. You study the nature of the adverse effects of drugs and other chemicals on living systems. You explore treatments of diseases in major organs and the effects of drugs used in chemotherapy.

Human Development

You are introduced to recent advances that have taken place in our understanding of human reproductive and developmental biology. You examine the process of human development from the formation of gametes (gametogenesis) through to birth and identifying genetic disorders. To complement this, you see how to apply this knowledge in the areas of stem cells, IVF and genetic counselling.

Human Metabolism and Clinical Biochemistry

You gain a broad understanding of the human metabolism, endocrinology and clinical biochemistry. Metabolism, the chemical processes that occurs in living organisms, is examined in the context of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cellular respiration and metabolism of drugs. Endocrinology, the study of the physiological role of hormones, is covered in detail, including a review of the mechanisms underpinning hormone action, the roles of second messengers and endocrine system disorders. Enzyme kinetics and enzyme regulation is also a significant topic.

The module will also explore the methods used for the collection, measurement and analysis of clinical samples in the biomedical laboratory. You will also cover the principles and applications of clinical biochemistry investigations used in screening, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease.

Immunology

You gain a solid foundation of the immune system and its role in protection against microorganisms and maintaining human health. You will learn about the functional organisation of the immune system, the immune cells and chemical mediators, antibodies, and cellular processes related to the innate and adaptive immune responses.

Life Course and Health

The life-course model is one of the most important ideas in public health. There are many influences on an individual’s health and well-being, including social, environmental, and economic factors. Some of these help promote health, such as a healthy diet, education and income. Others, like smoking and alcohol misuse, and poor education, have the opposite effect.

The life-course approach looks at the critical stages of life, and the different influences, good and not-so-good, on health. An evidence-based approach will help you understand key issues from preconception, to early years, adolescence, working life, into older age.

Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics

This module introduces you to a range of modern molecular biology concepts and techniques. General molecular biology, molecular biology of genetic diseases and the use of molecular biology for applications such as the production of recombinant proteins and biomedical science forensic applications will be addressed. The new age of molecular biology is underpinned by gene/genome sequencing, sequence analysis and sequence manipulation. You will be given a thorough introduction to the principles of sequence analysis and how these techniques have revolutionised all areas of molecular biology. Particular attention will be paid to the technique of PCR. The module will also introduce bioinformatics concepts around visualising and analysing DNA sequence data, as well as basic molecular data analysis. The module content will be delivered via a series of interactive lectures that will allow students to gain insight into the theoretical aspects of molecular biology and bioinformatics. A series of laboratory practical sessions will introduce the basic techniques that lie at the heart of modern molecular biology such as DNA purification, PCR, restriction digestion, nucleic acid analysis via agarose gels, and sequencing.

 

Year 3 optional placement year

Final-year core modules

Biologics and Health Product Development

You will develop the necessary entrepreneurship skills to understand the process of business start-up and be introduced to the necessary tools to manage nutrition, medical, biotech and the health care sector ventures. You will gain an awareness of the real-world challenges associated with the launch of a healthcare product from laboratory bench to the bedside. You will learn to research the market for gaps, design a product to fill that unmet need, and develop a business plan.

Human Ageing and Disease

You develop your understanding of the molecular, cellular and whole organism ageing processes. This module addresses how ageing occurs by the accumulation of damage to molecules, cells and tissues, resulting in a loss of function and leading to an increased risk of death. Ageing is a major risk factor for a number of diseases including dementia, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. This module addresses advances in intervention mechanisms which have contributed to reduced disease risk and development in an ageing population.

Medical Microbiology

You explore how modern clinical microbiology can be used to detect, diagnose and control infectious diseases. You extend your understanding of the molecular basis of microbial pathogenesis and it allows you to explore how modern molecular biology techniques have been employed to define the nature of host-pathogen interactions.

Science Research Project

You complete an in-depth, independent investigation into a specialist aspect of your field of study. In your project you will bring together a range of practical and academic skills developed in previous years of study. Regardless of the nature of the project, this process acts as a capstone experience requiring analysis and critical evaluation of data as well as critical reflection on the potential risks, moral and ethical issues. This piece of work will involve a significant individual contribution on your part. You will be supported by the appointment of an academic staff member as your research supervisor. They will act as a mentor and guide you through the development and completion of your research project.

Finally, you will communicate your independent research by producing a research poster and journal article to allow you to develop essential skills which mirror professional practice when research is presented at scientific conferences and for publication.

Sports Nutrition

You gain in-depth understanding of the nutritional and metabolic demands of exercise and of the interactions between diet, exercise and health. You also gain practical experience of how nutrition influences sports performance. The content and delivery of this module provides you with training in sport and exercise nutrition which will equip you for future careers in research, industry or in applied sports nutrition support.

 

Modules offered may vary.

 

How you learn

You learn through a range of teaching and learning methods including:

  • lectures

  • tutorials

  • seminars and workshops (including oral presentations and poster sessions)

  • laboratory work

  • computer laboratory-based sessions

  • group projects

  • research projects.


  • Each programme and module is supported by a specific virtual learning environment (VLE) site.

    How you are assessed

    You may be assessed through:

    • formal exams including 'unseen' exams

    • laboratory reports

    • computer-based assessments

    • problem-solving exercises

    • data interpretation exercises

    • critical analysis of case studies

    • oral presentations and technical interviews

    • essays, literature surveys, evaluations and summaries

    • collaborative project work

    • preparation and display of posters

    • planning, conduct and reporting of project work


    You will be provided with an assessment schedule providing details of the submission deadlines for summative assessments.


    Our Disability Services team provide an inclusive and empowering learning environment and have specialist staff to support disabled students access any additional tailored resources needed. If you have a specific learning difficulty, mental health condition, autism, sensory impairment, chronic health condition or any other disability please contact a Disability Services as early as possible.
    Find out more about our disability services

    Find out more about financial support
    Find out more about our course related costs

 
 

Entry requirements

Entry requirements

We are committed to widening participation and encourage all students with the potential to succeed, regardless of their background, to apply to study with us. We operate a flexible admissions policy taking into consideration individual circumstances, including personal achievements, relevant experience, personal qualities, as well as qualifications and grades.

Year 1 entry
96-112 UCAS tariff points.
You must have GCSE English and Mathematics at grade 4 (grade C) or equivalent and have studied at least one relevant subject at Level 3. Eligible subjects include:

Applied Science
Biology
Health Sciences

Typical Level 3 qualifications include:

A levels (within a minimum of grade C from one relevant subject)
BTEC Extended Diploma
Access to HE Diploma

Alternative equivalent UK and international qualifications and subjects are also considered. If you are not eligible for Year 1 entry, we also offer this course with an integrated foundation year.

Direct entry to later years
If you have previously studied a relevant subject at a higher level (HNC, HND or one or more years of a degree at another institution) we can consider you for direct entry to Year 2 or Final Year of this course. Please provide us with a complete detailed transcript of your previous studies with your application to help us determine your eligibility for advanced entry.

Applicant Days
If you receive an offer to study with us you will be invited to attend one of our Applicant Days. This is a great opportunity to learn more about studying at Teesside by exploring our campus, seeing our excellent facilities, meeting staff and students, and finding out more about your course.

The Applicant Day provides you with information, guidance and advice to help you make the right choice. Even if you have attended an Open Day we encourage you to attend the Applicant Day - we are confident you will find your visit a useful experience.

Non-EU international students
Non-EU international students who need a student visa to study in the UK should check our web pages on UKVI-compliant English language requirements. The University also provides pre-sessional English language courses if you do not meet the minimum English language requirement.

For additional information please see our entry requirements

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country


You can gain considerable knowledge from work, volunteering and life. Under recognition of prior learning (RPL) you may be awarded credit for this which can be credited towards the course you want to study.
Find out more about RPL

 

Employability

Career opportunities

Graduates are sought by a wide range of industries and organisations which include pharmaceutical industries, hospitals and government laboratories. Graduates may enter the teaching profession or undertake employment in research and development laboratories.

Work placement

A work placement officer and the University's award-winning careers service are available to help you with applying for a placement. Advice is also available on job hunting and networking.

By taking a work placement year you gain experience favoured by graduate recruiters and develop your technical skillset. You also obtain the transferable skills required in any professional environment. Transferable skills include communication, negotiation, teamwork, leadership, organisation, confidence, self-reliance, problem-solving, being able to work under pressure, and commercial awareness.

An increasing number of employers view a placement as a year-long interview and, as a result, placements are increasingly becoming an essential part of an organisation's pre-selection strategy in their graduate recruitment process.

Potential benefits from completing a work placement year include:

  • improved job prospects
  • enhanced employment skills and improved career progression opportunities
  • a higher starting salary than your full-time counterparts
  • a better degree classification
  • a richer CV
  • a year's salary before completing your degree
  • experience of workplace culture
  • the opportunity to design and base your final-year project within a working environment.

 

Information for international applicants

Qualifications

International applicants - find out what qualifications you need by selecting your country below.

Select your country:

  
 

Useful information

Visit our international pages for useful information for non-UK students and applicants.

Talk to us

Talk to an international student enrolment adviser

 
 

Full-time

Entry to 2020/21 academic year

Fee for UK/EU applicants
£9,250 a year

More details about our fees

Fee for international applicants
£13,000 a year

More details about our fees for international applicants


What is included in your tuition fee?

  • Length: 3 years (or 4 with a work placement)
  • UCAS code: B150 BSc/HB
  • Semester dates
  • Typical offer: 96-112 tariff points

Apply online (full-time) through UCAS

 

Part-time

2020/21 entry

Fee for UK/EU applicants
£4,500 (120 credits)

More details about our fees

  • Length: 6 years if entering Year 1; 4 years if entering Year 2
  • Attendance: Timetable governed - please contact our admissions office
  • Enrolment date: September
  • Semester dates

Apply online (part-time)

 
 
 

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Accommodation

Live in affordable accommodation right on-campus

 

Campus

Study in our town-centre campus with over £270m of recent investment

 

Industry ready

Benefit from work placements, live projects, accredited courses

 

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Open days

 

15 August 2020
Clearing Fair

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