Undergraduate study
Psychology with Criminology

Psychology with Criminology
BSc (Hons)

C8M9 BSc/PCr (C8M8 BSc/PCrFY for Year 0 entry)

 
 
 

Course overview

Criminology is the study of crime, human rights and the criminal justice system at the individual, social and global level. You examine the contribution that psychological perspectives and methods can make to our understanding of crime and the criminal justice system.

As a psychology with criminology student, you cover core modules included in the BSc (Hons) Psychology programme, in addition to specific modules in criminology.

By studying psychology with criminology you consider the impact that society and the media have on crime rates and public perceptions of crime. Like our other psychology degree programmes, the analytical and communication skills you develop on the course are prized by employers in a wide range of careers. This degree provides an excellent academic background for a variety of stimulating careers in psychology and criminal justice agencies as well as in research, education and in a wider variety of voluntary and statutory organisations.

This programme is accredited by the British Psychological Society and can be your first step towards becoming a chartered psychologist.

Professional accreditation

The British Psycholigical Society Accredited This is a joint honours programme accredited by the British Psychological Society

 

Course details

Course structure

Year 0 (foundation year) core modules

Academic Study Skills Toolkit

This module will assist you in developing the personal and academic skills that you will need for undergraduate study. It focusses on developing skills such as information retrieval, evaluation, critical thinking, note taking, presentation skills and group work.

Contemporary Issues in Social Sciences

This module will introduce you to the historical and contemporary development of social science disciplines and will provide examples of theoretical challenges and the ways in which research is applied in society. You will gain an understanding of the critical differences between disciplines and how interdisciplinary research is fostered through collaboration. You will also be introduced to academic standards, ethical guidelines and research protocols, personal development planning and to a range of study and transferable skills relevant to your degree course and beyond.

Fake News: Propaganda and Polemics, Past and Present

This module provides you with the opportunity to develop your skills in thinking critically about the information and analysis presented in an array of media in today’s digital world, drawing on the methodologies of a range of disciplines within the social sciences, humanities and law. You will explore examples of the debates over fake news in both the past and present, and look at how fake news can be used to both support and undermine the status quo, enabling you in the process to become more savvy and engaged citizens.

Introduction to Sport and Psychology

This module will provide students with an introduction to the core scientific principles needed to engage effectively with research in the disciplines of sport and psychology. You will learn biological principles underpinning physiological and psychological functioning, approaches to and applications of research in health and well-being and you will be introduced to research and statistical practices in the social sciences.

Project

This module allows students to identify an area of interest related to their undergraduate degree and to explore this through a small scale research project where students will be required to produce an analysis of an area of focus.

Teesside: History, Literature, Culture, and Society

This module provides you with an opportunity to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to the Teesside region. You will learn about Teesside’s history, culture and society through the examination of various topics which will give you a deeper understanding of the region, both past and present.

 

Year 1 core modules

Crime and Justice

This module introduces the criminal justice process, theoretically and in practice, from a criminological viewpoint. It offers an analysis of the process of criminal justice from the point of arrest to the outcome of a court hearing.

You examine the agencies and institutions of the law, as well as the criminological theories that produce knowledge for these institutions. The module allows you to participate in an inclusive environment for learning the foundational principles that have informed criminal justice debates to date.

Crime and Society

This introduction to criminological theories, media representations of crime and the way in which we understand crime and deviance in contemporary society serves as a foundation to further criminological theory modules at levels 5 and 6.

You gain the solid basis of knowledge needed to explore debates about who commits crime, why crime is committed and why crime is seen as a social problem. You are introduced to a range of classic and traditional theoretical perspectives which provide the foundations for more complex and contemporary theoretical perspectives later in the programme.

Critical Thinking about Psychology

This module provides students with many of the skills needed to critically evaluate psychological theories and studies. It uses examples from psychology to highlight the common errors that people make when assessing arguments and evaluating evidence.

The module provides step-by-step guidance on how to overcome widespread mistakes and how to construct logical, balanced and coherent arguments. The module also requires students to assess the validity of a number of extraordinary claims, such as parapsychology, alternative medicine, astrology and mediumship. Students will be encouraged to be open-minded, yet require appropriate standards of proof when evaluating such claims.

Human Development and Social Psychology

Psychobiology, Cognition and Individual Differences

Psychological Research Design and Analysis 1

Providing a foundation in psychological research methods and analysis, this module covers a range of experimental and non-experimental methodological approaches.

You are introduced to the Windows SPSS package for statistical analysis and graph drawing, and you learn about simple qualitative research and data collection methods.

The module covers ethics in research, qualitative and quantitative methods, survey design, simple non-experimental and experimental designs, reliability and validity, probability, hypothesis testing, descriptive data analysis, simple non-parametric and parametric statistical analysis and research report writing.

By the end of the module, you’ll be able to identify the appropriate method for a range of research questions, analyse the resulting data and draw appropriate conclusions.

 

Year 2 core modules

Biological and Social Psychology

The module is divided into two halves: biopsychology and social psychology. Biological, neurological and social explanations for a series of identified psychological topics are explored, as well as introducing the concept of evolutionary explanations for human behaviour and the scientific approach to the study of our social behaviour. Students are required to produce a 2,000 social psychology essay (50%) and complete a 2 hour unseen biopsychology written examination (50%) for their assessment in this module.

Criminological Theory

This module builds on the theoretical material covered in Year 1 and you develop a more detailed analysis of key ideas in historical and contemporary criminology. The first half of the term deals with the history of ideas in criminology. The second half applies those ideas to contemporary patterns in crime and disorder.

Development, Cognitive Processes and Disorders

Psychological Research Design and Analysis 2

The module deals with more advanced research design and analysis, building on the module Research design and analysis 1. The module aims to facilitate the development of knowledge and skills in using advanced research designs, including the use of quantitative and qualitative analysis techniques.

Module content includes conceptual issues in advanced research designs - including experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental quantitative research designs - planning of sample size, quantitative data analysis (ANOVA and multiple regression), and qualitative data collection and analysis.

Psychology Dissertation Preparation

The module commences with a series of lectures that introduce you to research management, supervision protocol, research ethics, personal development and career planning.
You are then introduced to specific psychological research studies that further develop your understanding of the research cycle (setting a research question, developing appropriate methods, using appropriate analysis, making appropriate conclusions and dissemination) and critical evaluation, to help develop ideas for your degree-relevant honours project.
Lectures are themed into general disciplines of psychology (i.e. cognitive, social, biological, developmental, individual differences) and are delivered by experts from within the subject group.

Psychopathologies, Individual Differences and Psychometrics

 

Final-year core modules

Dissertation

Your dissertation is based around the investigation of a topic linked to your programme of study, selected by you in consultation with a dissertation supervisor. It represents a core compulsory element for British Psychological Society membership accreditation.

The dissertation involves a poster presentation, a pass/fail ethical approval and a written project report. It also includes a PDP element which involves you creating a personal statement and a CV written to address the person specifications of a graduate job.

Explaining Punishment

This module explores the emergence and development of modern institutions of punishment with specific reference to wider currents of sociological thought, and explanations of formal social control and punishment.

Areas covered include the transition from pre-modern corporal and brutal punishment to more rationalised and intensive modes of punishment under capitalism as well as theoretical interrogations of the economic, political and ideological processes that shape institutions of punishment in contemporary society.

The module involves a thorough discussion of Marxist, functionalist, institutionalist and postmodernist approaches towards the subject matter, offering ample opportunity for the application and critical evaluation of the explanatory potential of such approaches on specific characteristics and functions of the penal system today.

Issues in Psychology

This module is aimed to introduce students to a number of debates in applied psychology. The module content is aimed to meet learning needs of students interested in aspects of applied psychology and to foster self-directed learning.

 

and two optional modules (one must be a criminology module and one must be a psychology option)

Are We Doing Youth Justice?

This module is divided into four core elements, each delivered in a block of six lectures, of which the final lecture focuses on key themes and contents. The first block provides a comprehensive picture of the youth justice system, as established post 1997 by New Labour.

Block two explores criminological, sociological and psychological explanations of youth offending.

Block three examines the idea of unruly youth from a historical perspective of the regulation of (gendered) childhood and the relevance of social class in identifying and explaining youth offending.

Block four examines key questions and themes of block one, two and three in relation to their implicit implications and underlying ideologies in terms of how young offenders are conceptualised and dealt with in England and Wales’ youth justice system today.

Current Issues in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

This module is aimed at students who have an interest in applied aspects of cognitive psychology, especially educational psychology, as well as those interested in developmental and bio-psychology.
The module introduces you to a range of different neurodevelopmental disorders e.g. autistic spectrum disorder, dyslexia, ADHD, specific-language impairment, Williams syndrome, Dyscalculia, Fragile X and Downs syndrome. Each disorder will be considered in terms of its diagnostic criteria, characteristics, theoretical perspectives and issues with comorbidity. As such we will discuss each condition at the levels of biology (including genetics), cognition, behaviour and the environment.
Wider issues such as the social aspects of neurodevelopmental disorders, including integration in education, lifespan changes and methodological and ethical issues in researching neurodevelopmental disorders will also be addressed.

Developing Skills for Educational and Community Support

This module provides you with experience and knowledge of working as a support worker with Neuro Partners (www.neuropartners.co.uk/). You develop transferable / employability skills, such as confidentiality, data protection, communications, problem-solving, group work, time management, self-management, and record keeping. The work experience enables you to work within a team whilst maintaining boundaries and a professional relationship with an individual. The service users will have a range of conditions, including mental health conditions and possibly co-morbid disorders and considerations when approaching support. You will be working on any combination of the following types of support:

Education-based support: Sighted Guide, Mobility Support, Travel Support, Note Taker, Transcriber, Library Assistant, Proof reading, Reader, Exam Support

Community-based support: Personal Care, Community access, Accessing social and leisure activities with service users, Assisting the service user during Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech and Language Therapy. Community-based hours will include evenings and weekends.

Prior to commencing the module, you are required to apply for Disclosure and Barring Services (DBS) enhanced disclosure and successfully complete the Neuro Partners interview, assessment centre and training. DBS applications will be made during the interview. You will receive full training for the role of support worker (delivered by Neuro Partners) and have regular contact with an Assistant Psychologist, who will appraise you 3 times throughout the year.

You will have 6 hours contact at Teesside University to introduce the module and go through assessment requirements. This will be delivered as 3 x 2hour lectures (delivered throughout the year). The module requires you to be available for the full duration of the academic year (30 weeks) and accumulate a minimum of 70 hours of support work experience. It is expected that you will gain 2-3 hours support work experience per week and will document your experience by completing logs after every session.

Moral Economy of Criminal Justice

Explore the moral economy of criminal justice, and gain an original, analytical perspective on the discipline.

The first part of the module introduces intellectual and moral resources which draw on western philosophical heritage, theology, personalism, symbolic ethics, and moral conditions before and after the Industrial Age.

The second part of the module puts these intellectual and moral resources to work to analyse developments in criminal justice, including penal policy and probation, from 1979 into the present.

Particular reference is made to the conservative period of criminal justice between 1979 and 1997; New Labour between 1997 and 2010; and the coalition government from 2010 to 2015 and beyond.

Promoting Health, Preventing Illness

This module explores psychology’s role in progressing, treating and managing illness. You will consider the dominant discussions of health and illness and explore the methods used to measure and assess health and illness. This module explores health promotion interventions, particularly the associated psychological issues that need to be considered when you are addressing the health and illness needs of individuals across the lifespan.

Race, Crime and Social Exclusion

An exploration of the ways the categories of race, ethnicity and social class are constructed and represented by the various forms and institutions that constitute the criminal justice system and wider systems of social control.

You examine the ideological, historical, economic and socio-political context of how race and class came to be associated with crime and criminal justice. We discuss how this association has been generated in part through early criminological discourse and through contemporary academic assessment of evidence and explanations about whether, and to what extent, minority ethnic criminality and victimisation is constructed through racism.

Case studies of criminality and victimisation, policing, stop and search, the courts, penality, genocide, and racial violence are used. You are asked to acquaint yourself with relevant theoretical and policy perspectives and debates about minority ethnic groups in relation to the criminal justice system, and to ask yourself whether theories of racism can enhance a criminological understanding of this area.

The Psychology of Criminal Behaviour

The Psychology of Everyday Self

This module provides an arena for you to study in depth one of the most intriguing and misunderstood aspects of psychological experience – that of selfhood.
It brings together a number of sub-disciplines that throw light on selfhood and subjective experience. Perspectives from social, developmental, and clinical psychology are combined in this module to offer you the opportunity to explore what selfhood means to you and how different constructs of selfhood can be enriching to the human experience.

Therapeutic Care and Meaningful Interactions

Therapeutic Care and Meaningful Interactions provides you with experience and knowledge of working as a Therapeutic Care Volunteer (TCV) within South Tees NHS Trust. You have the opportunity to develop transferable knowledge and employability skills. You cover confidentiality, data protection, communications, problem-solving, group work, time management, self-management, and record keeping. You have the opportunity to work within a health care team across any combination of wards across the Trust and community hospitals, whilst maintaining boundaries and a professional relationship with individuals.

Understanding Domestic and Sexual Violence

Critically examine the nature, extent and impact of sexual and domestic violence from a range of academic, theoretical, research, policy and practitioner perspectives. Explore the links between the various aspects of domestic and sexual violence, including rape and sexual assault, domestic violence, honour based violence and sexual exploitation.

You engage with the conceptual, methodological and ethical issues which characterise historically hidden problems – and we focus on the continued need for sensitivity in exploring and addressing these issues. The module traces the emergence of sexual and domestic violence as criminological problems, and critically examines the changing legal, policing, criminal justice and community responses.

 

Modules offered may vary.

 

How you learn

Teaching is delivered using a range of lectures, seminars and laboratory classes. We emphasise study skills so you learn how to use all our extensive facilities such as electronic journals, virtual learning environments and computer programs. You also have access to our computer suites and specialist laboratories where you develop practical skills in the investigation of human behaviour.

How you are assessed

Our varied assessments develop the skills most valued by employers. Our range of assessments include essays, research reports, exams, group and individual projects and presentations, poster presentations, portfolios and a dissertation.



Our Disability Services team provide an inclusive and empowering learning environment and have specialist staff to support disabled students access any additional tailored resources needed. If you have a specific learning difficulty, mental health condition, autism, sensory impairment, chronic health condition or any other disability please contact a Disability Services as early as possible.
Find out more about our disability services

Find out more about financial support
Find out more about our course related costs

 
 

Entry requirements

Entry requirements

A typical offer is 88-112 tariff points from at least two A levels (or equivalent). You must also have GCSEs in English and maths at grade 4 (grade C) or equivalent.

For entry to Year 0 (Foundation Year) a typical offer is 32-64 tariff points from at least two A levels (or equivalent) and GCSE grade 4 (grade C) or equivalent in English and maths.

For additional information please see the entry requirements in our admissions section

International applicants can find out what qualifications they need by visiting Your Country


You can gain considerable knowledge from work, volunteering and life. Under recognition of prior learning (RPL) you may be awarded credit for this which can be credited towards the course you want to study.
Find out more about RPL

 

Employability

Career opportunities

Although this is an academic course rather than a professional training course, on successful completion, with a 2.2 or above, you will be eligible to apply for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) status with the British Psychological Society (www.bps.org.uk). As with all our psychology degrees, upon graduation you can proceed to further study in any area of psychology. However, the unique skills and knowledge developed on this course are particularly suited to careers in health and social welfare, the probation service, the prison service, the police and voluntary organisations.

All programmes are designed to incorporate employability skills development alongside your degree course. Our staff utilise their extensive connections to provide many and varied opportunities to engage with potential employers through fairs, guest lecture sessions, live projects and site visits. In addition we offer a series of workshops and events in the first, second and third year that ensure all students are equipped with both degree level subject knowledge PLUS the practical skills that employers are looking for in new graduate recruits.

You are encouraged to develop your employability through volunteering which can help you develop new skills, improve networking and enhance your CV. Teesside University has a dedicated service, Volun-tees, which aims to engage students in relevant volunteering activities both within the local community and on University-led programmes. Projects can include working with offenders, supporting victims and witnesses of crime, facilitating activities for clients with mental health issues, working with children and more.

Our award-winning careers service works with regional and national employers to advertise graduate positions, in addition to providing post-graduation support for all Teesside University alumni.

 

Information for international applicants

Qualifications

International applicants - find out what qualifications you need by selecting your country below.

Select your country:

  
 

Useful information

Visit our international pages for useful information for non-UK students and applicants.

Talk to us

Talk to an international student adviser

 
 

Full-time

Entry to 2019/20 academic year

Fee for UK/EU applicants
£9,250 a year

More details about our fees

Fee for international applicants
£11,825 a year

More details about our fees for international applicants


What is included in your tuition fee?

  • Length: 3 years or 4 years including foundation year
  • UCAS code: C8M9 BSc/PCr
    C8M8 BSc/PCrFY for Year 0 entry
  • Semester dates
  • Typical offer: 88-112 tariff points from at least 2 A levels (or equivalent)

Apply online (full-time) through UCAS

 

Part-time

2019 entry

Fee for UK/EU applicants:
£4,500 (120 credits)
More details about our fees

  • Length: Up to 5 years
  • Attendance: Daytime
  • Enrolment date: September
  • Admission enquiries: 01642 342312
  • Semester dates

Apply online (part-time)

 
 

Facilities

Studying Psychology at the School of Social Sciences, Humanities & Law gives you access to outstanding facilities, including eye-trackers, EEG and Near-infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS). You also get to use specialist interviewing labs and our replica courtroom.

 

Choose Teesside

iPad

Are you eligible for an iPad, keyboard and £300 credit for learning resources?

 

Accommodation

Live in affordable accommodation right on-campus

 

Campus

Study in our town-centre campus with over £270m of recent investment

 

Industry ready

Benefit from work placements, live projects, accredited courses

 

Get in touch

 

Open days

17 August 2019
Clearing fair

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